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Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History by C. Dallett Hemphill (review)

Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History by C. Dallett Hemphill (review) R EVIEWS EDITED BY SEAN P. HARVEY AND LUCIA McMAHON Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History. By C. Dallett Hemphill. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 328. Cloth, $36.95.) Reviewed by Vivian Bruce Conger I write this review in sorrow and in joy. With Dallett Hemphill's death we sadly lost a good friend and scholar, but I am privileged to write this review of Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History, which was recently released in paperback. Hemphill argues that even though siblings have generally been overlooked by individuals and historians alike, ``brothers and sisters have always played a key role in shaping history'' (3). She presents an indepth analysis of differing relationships between siblings across time and space. Sibling relationships were ``the proving grounds'' of momentous changes in American political, legal, social, and gendered cultures. While the author does not ignore the lives of African Americans and Native Americans, her study focuses primarily on the white middle class, the group that generally left behind the most sources. Hemphill researched an impressive array of family papers, letters, diaries, memoirs, advice literature, novels, children's books, and paintings to explore siblings' actual and prescribed lives north and south, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History by C. Dallett Hemphill (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 36 (1) – Feb 25, 2016

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

R EVIEWS EDITED BY SEAN P. HARVEY AND LUCIA McMAHON Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History. By C. Dallett Hemphill. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 328. Cloth, $36.95.) Reviewed by Vivian Bruce Conger I write this review in sorrow and in joy. With Dallett Hemphill's death we sadly lost a good friend and scholar, but I am privileged to write this review of Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History, which was recently released in paperback. Hemphill argues that even though siblings have generally been overlooked by individuals and historians alike, ``brothers and sisters have always played a key role in shaping history'' (3). She presents an indepth analysis of differing relationships between siblings across time and space. Sibling relationships were ``the proving grounds'' of momentous changes in American political, legal, social, and gendered cultures. While the author does not ignore the lives of African Americans and Native Americans, her study focuses primarily on the white middle class, the group that generally left behind the most sources. Hemphill researched an impressive array of family papers, letters, diaries, memoirs, advice literature, novels, children's books, and paintings to explore siblings' actual and prescribed lives north and south,

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 25, 2016

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