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Ship of Death: A Voyage that Changed the Atlantic World by Billy G. Smith (review)

Ship of Death: A Voyage that Changed the Atlantic World by Billy G. Smith (review) REVIEWS a crescendo of philosophy, argument, politics, and concern for family happiness. John Adams confronts a choice shaped and guided by his attempts to remain philosophical while acknowledging his ambition; gradually, he yields to the promptings of his conviction that he would be the best choice to succeed Washington, and his desire to do so as a matter of personal vindication in his own eyes and in the eyes of the nation. Abigail Adams too faces choices; her frail health and distaste for public life in general and the new nation's capital in Philadelphia in particular war with her desire to see her husband's ambition vindicated and to stand by him as the new first lady. Soon the Adams sons jump into the fray or are pulled into it, and the argument about their collective future as a family swirls around the central issue of John Adams's fate in the election of 1796, the first contested presidential election in American history. All the while, John and Abigail Adams continue to mentor their sons, two of them rising young diplomats and the third aspiring to success at the bar. The continuing blend of public and private elements and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Ship of Death: A Voyage that Changed the Atlantic World by Billy G. Smith (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (3) – Aug 12, 2014

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS a crescendo of philosophy, argument, politics, and concern for family happiness. John Adams confronts a choice shaped and guided by his attempts to remain philosophical while acknowledging his ambition; gradually, he yields to the promptings of his conviction that he would be the best choice to succeed Washington, and his desire to do so as a matter of personal vindication in his own eyes and in the eyes of the nation. Abigail Adams too faces choices; her frail health and distaste for public life in general and the new nation's capital in Philadelphia in particular war with her desire to see her husband's ambition vindicated and to stand by him as the new first lady. Soon the Adams sons jump into the fray or are pulled into it, and the argument about their collective future as a family swirls around the central issue of John Adams's fate in the election of 1796, the first contested presidential election in American history. All the while, John and Abigail Adams continue to mentor their sons, two of them rising young diplomats and the third aspiring to success at the bar. The continuing blend of public and private elements and the

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 12, 2014

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