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Sex and the Founding Fathers: The American Quest for a Relatable Past by Thomas A. Foster (review)

Sex and the Founding Fathers: The American Quest for a Relatable Past by Thomas A. Foster (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2016) between brothers but also between sisters. Their relationships seemed to be more practical than affectionate, and the elder sister role had no counterpart in the south. Frontier siblings simply needed to cooperate and work together, and there was no clear pattern of recognized authority or deep emotional connections on the part of either elder brothers or elder sisters in the American west. Hemphill ends her richly detailed, complex, and well-argued family history with these lines: ``An understanding of the ways siblings functioned in past time can, if we want, inspire us to adopt new family values and promoter greater sibling solidarity today. It is not a bad idea . . . our brothers and sisters offer an alliance that is hard to beat'' (222). This is a powerful ending to a powerful book. Vi vian Bru ce C onge r is an associate professor and Robert Ryan Professor in the Humanities in the Department of History at Ithaca College. She is the author of The Widows' Might: Widowhood and Gender in Early British America (New York, 2009), and The Worlds of Deborah Read Franklin and Sally Franklin Bache: Transgenerational Lives in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Sex and the Founding Fathers: The American Quest for a Relatable Past by Thomas A. Foster (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 36 (1) – Feb 25, 2016

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2016) between brothers but also between sisters. Their relationships seemed to be more practical than affectionate, and the elder sister role had no counterpart in the south. Frontier siblings simply needed to cooperate and work together, and there was no clear pattern of recognized authority or deep emotional connections on the part of either elder brothers or elder sisters in the American west. Hemphill ends her richly detailed, complex, and well-argued family history with these lines: ``An understanding of the ways siblings functioned in past time can, if we want, inspire us to adopt new family values and promoter greater sibling solidarity today. It is not a bad idea . . . our brothers and sisters offer an alliance that is hard to beat'' (222). This is a powerful ending to a powerful book. Vi vian Bru ce C onge r is an associate professor and Robert Ryan Professor in the Humanities in the Department of History at Ithaca College. She is the author of The Widows' Might: Widowhood and Gender in Early British America (New York, 2009), and The Worlds of Deborah Read Franklin and Sally Franklin Bache: Transgenerational Lives in

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 25, 2016

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