Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Seneca Possessed: Indians, Witchcraft, and Power in the Early American Republic (review)

Seneca Possessed: Indians, Witchcraft, and Power in the Early American Republic (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2010) ideas of other religious groups have influenced the philosophies of other leading political and constitutional actors. In the end, Calvert backs away from ascribing too much causal force to the Quakers and is content to claim that Quakers were ``the first'' to articulate a modern constitutionalism, and especially the tactic of civil disobedience that would later prove so important (312). In a fascinating epilogue, Calvert charts the persistence of Quaker constitutionalism, particularly in the work of abolitionists and civil rights activists, with broad brush strokes. The road from John Dickinson to Lucretia Mott to Bayard Rustin and Martin Luther King, Jr., however, is a long one and remembering the diversity of political influences, religious and secular, that shaped these reformers' politics seems essential. Furthermore, abolitionists and civil rights activists have not been the only Americans who have sought to reform the ship of state through civil disobedience. Examining other practitioners of civil disobedience across the political spectrum, even those whose political practices do not fit perfectly with Calvert's definition of ``true'' civil disobedience, might prove worthwhile (327). Now that we know that Quakers were ``the first,'' we can examine how their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Seneca Possessed: Indians, Witchcraft, and Power in the Early American Republic (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (4) – Nov 26, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/seneca-possessed-indians-witchcraft-and-power-in-the-early-american-hP5M82obY9
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2010) ideas of other religious groups have influenced the philosophies of other leading political and constitutional actors. In the end, Calvert backs away from ascribing too much causal force to the Quakers and is content to claim that Quakers were ``the first'' to articulate a modern constitutionalism, and especially the tactic of civil disobedience that would later prove so important (312). In a fascinating epilogue, Calvert charts the persistence of Quaker constitutionalism, particularly in the work of abolitionists and civil rights activists, with broad brush strokes. The road from John Dickinson to Lucretia Mott to Bayard Rustin and Martin Luther King, Jr., however, is a long one and remembering the diversity of political influences, religious and secular, that shaped these reformers' politics seems essential. Furthermore, abolitionists and civil rights activists have not been the only Americans who have sought to reform the ship of state through civil disobedience. Examining other practitioners of civil disobedience across the political spectrum, even those whose political practices do not fit perfectly with Calvert's definition of ``true'' civil disobedience, might prove worthwhile (327). Now that we know that Quakers were ``the first,'' we can examine how their

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 26, 2010

There are no references for this article.