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Secularization, Genealogy, and the Legitimacy of the Modern Age: Remarks on the Löwith-Blumenberg Debate

Secularization, Genealogy, and the Legitimacy of the Modern Age: Remarks on the... <p>Abstract:</p><p>This essay reconstructs the secularization debate between Blumenberg and Löwith. It explores what a genealogy of secular modernity can and cannot accomplish, asking how to build on Blumenberg&apos;s legacy without repeating his errors. Blumenberg absorbed the skepticism of a genealogy of secularism and responded with an unrealistic image of disconnected modernity, while also understanding that modernity might contain normative resources of its own not requiring the redemptive efforts of secularizing translation. The legitimacy of the modern age involves not only the secularizing redemption of religious norms but also a search for sources of profane hope beyond the confines of tradition.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the History of Ideas University of Pennsylvania Press

Secularization, Genealogy, and the Legitimacy of the Modern Age: Remarks on the Löwith-Blumenberg Debate

Journal of the History of Ideas , Volume 80 (1) – Jan 30, 2019

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Journal of the History of Ideas, Inc.
ISSN
1086-3222

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This essay reconstructs the secularization debate between Blumenberg and Löwith. It explores what a genealogy of secular modernity can and cannot accomplish, asking how to build on Blumenberg&apos;s legacy without repeating his errors. Blumenberg absorbed the skepticism of a genealogy of secularism and responded with an unrealistic image of disconnected modernity, while also understanding that modernity might contain normative resources of its own not requiring the redemptive efforts of secularizing translation. The legitimacy of the modern age involves not only the secularizing redemption of religious norms but also a search for sources of profane hope beyond the confines of tradition.</p>

Journal

Journal of the History of IdeasUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jan 30, 2019

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