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Schooling Citizens: The Struggle for African American Education in Antebellum America (review)

Schooling Citizens: The Struggle for African American Education in Antebellum America (review) REVIEWS Schooling Citizens: The Struggle for African American Education in Antebellum America. By Hilary J. Moss. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009. Pp. 296. Cloth, $37.50). Reviewed by Peter Hinks Hilary Moss has produced a compelling study of African American access to education--both public and private--in antebellum America. She focuses on the urban Northeast, although she also investigates these matters on the middle ground of Baltimore. She intends ``to make sense of the widespread, often violent, white opposition to African American education that erupted in northern and southern communities in the early 1830s, a period that coincides with the birth of public education . . . in America'' (3). Moss examines three cities where the pursuit of education by black parents and activists white and black elicited keen reactions from the surrounding white communities--New Haven in the late 1820s­30s, Baltimore in the 1840s, and Boston in the mid 1830s and late 1840s­50s. She concludes that the emerging public school system of the antebellum North worked hand-in-hand with an increasingly pervasive culture of white domination to deny African Americans equal access to schools and education--key vehicles for creating citizens--and thereby reinforced the popular understanding that they were noncitizens. New http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Schooling Citizens: The Struggle for African American Education in Antebellum America (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (1) – Feb 8, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS Schooling Citizens: The Struggle for African American Education in Antebellum America. By Hilary J. Moss. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009. Pp. 296. Cloth, $37.50). Reviewed by Peter Hinks Hilary Moss has produced a compelling study of African American access to education--both public and private--in antebellum America. She focuses on the urban Northeast, although she also investigates these matters on the middle ground of Baltimore. She intends ``to make sense of the widespread, often violent, white opposition to African American education that erupted in northern and southern communities in the early 1830s, a period that coincides with the birth of public education . . . in America'' (3). Moss examines three cities where the pursuit of education by black parents and activists white and black elicited keen reactions from the surrounding white communities--New Haven in the late 1820s­30s, Baltimore in the 1840s, and Boston in the mid 1830s and late 1840s­50s. She concludes that the emerging public school system of the antebellum North worked hand-in-hand with an increasingly pervasive culture of white domination to deny African Americans equal access to schools and education--key vehicles for creating citizens--and thereby reinforced the popular understanding that they were noncitizens. New

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 8, 2012

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