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Rivers of Sand: Creek Indian Emigration, Relocation, and Ethnic Cleansing in the American South by Christopher D. Haveman (review)

Rivers of Sand: Creek Indian Emigration, Relocation, and Ethnic Cleansing in the American South... War. Clavin looks at the role of slaves in industry, the use of slaves by the American military, and the mingling of blacks and whites during everyday life. He also examines the importance of interracial cooperation in the functioning of the Underground Railroad and the aiding of fugitive slaves who escaped in and around Pensacola. Clavin convincingly shows that Pensacola inhabited a space in which an “enduring interracial assault on slavery . . . had always existed on the Southern frontier” (146). His examination of the Civil War in Pensacola emphasizes both the cooperation and tensions bred by interracialism in this region. Clavin does an excellent job of using Pensacola to show the relatively tenuous control that slave owners had, particularly on the edges of the southern frontier. Moreover, his treatment of interracialism is valuable to understanding southern society, slavery, and the fugitive slave issue as it existed in Pensacola and beyond. Perha the weakest part of this study is its discussion and integration with the Atlantic world, which seems to disappear after Clavin’s discussion of black mariners and the Atlantic connections during the colonial period. It would have been interesting to see the responses of the city’s http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Rivers of Sand: Creek Indian Emigration, Relocation, and Ethnic Cleansing in the American South by Christopher D. Haveman (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 37 (3) – Sep 1, 2017

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

War. Clavin looks at the role of slaves in industry, the use of slaves by the American military, and the mingling of blacks and whites during everyday life. He also examines the importance of interracial cooperation in the functioning of the Underground Railroad and the aiding of fugitive slaves who escaped in and around Pensacola. Clavin convincingly shows that Pensacola inhabited a space in which an “enduring interracial assault on slavery . . . had always existed on the Southern frontier” (146). His examination of the Civil War in Pensacola emphasizes both the cooperation and tensions bred by interracialism in this region. Clavin does an excellent job of using Pensacola to show the relatively tenuous control that slave owners had, particularly on the edges of the southern frontier. Moreover, his treatment of interracialism is valuable to understanding southern society, slavery, and the fugitive slave issue as it existed in Pensacola and beyond. Perha the weakest part of this study is its discussion and integration with the Atlantic world, which seems to disappear after Clavin’s discussion of black mariners and the Atlantic connections during the colonial period. It would have been interesting to see the responses of the city’s

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Sep 1, 2017

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