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Rhetoric, Science, and Magic in Seventeenth-Century England (review)

Rhetoric, Science, and Magic in Seventeenth-Century England (review) time to eradicate ontological and cosmological dualism and open up the possibility of a more direct encounter with the ``other.'' In all, Gutierrez has woven a spectacular text that should be compulsory reading for those looking for a history of ideas approach to a phenomenon that has been primarily, though not exclusively, mined for its sociological and political import. Her tracing of the esoteric strains and resonances is overall well done, though if I had my druthers the book would have been extended in order to accommodate more source analysis in that field. Nevertheless, everything that is included is rather exceptional, and scholars of American metaphysical religion, esotericism, and the history of ideas in nineteenthcentury America will be pleasantly rewarded for their reading. matthew j. dillon Rice University ryan j. stark. Rhetoric, Science, and Magic in Seventeenth-Century England. Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America Press, 2009. Pp. 234. Ryan J. Stark's Rhetoric, Science, and Magic in Seventeenth-Century England revisits a paradox in seventeenth-century writing that has long puzzled literary scholars: how do we reconcile early scientists' calls for a ``plain'' writing style with their own figurative, even florid, prose? As Stark notes in his introduction, previous critics http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft University of Pennsylvania Press

Rhetoric, Science, and Magic in Seventeenth-Century England (review)

Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft , Volume 7 (2) – Nov 10, 2012

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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The University of Pennsylvania Press
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1940-5111
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Abstract

time to eradicate ontological and cosmological dualism and open up the possibility of a more direct encounter with the ``other.'' In all, Gutierrez has woven a spectacular text that should be compulsory reading for those looking for a history of ideas approach to a phenomenon that has been primarily, though not exclusively, mined for its sociological and political import. Her tracing of the esoteric strains and resonances is overall well done, though if I had my druthers the book would have been extended in order to accommodate more source analysis in that field. Nevertheless, everything that is included is rather exceptional, and scholars of American metaphysical religion, esotericism, and the history of ideas in nineteenthcentury America will be pleasantly rewarded for their reading. matthew j. dillon Rice University ryan j. stark. Rhetoric, Science, and Magic in Seventeenth-Century England. Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America Press, 2009. Pp. 234. Ryan J. Stark's Rhetoric, Science, and Magic in Seventeenth-Century England revisits a paradox in seventeenth-century writing that has long puzzled literary scholars: how do we reconcile early scientists' calls for a ``plain'' writing style with their own figurative, even florid, prose? As Stark notes in his introduction, previous critics

Journal

Magic, Ritual, and WitchcraftUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 10, 2012

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