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Revolutionary Conceptions: Women, Fertility, and Family Limitation in America, 1760–1820 (review)

Revolutionary Conceptions: Women, Fertility, and Family Limitation in America, 1760–1820 (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2010) continue to prove that women's economic roles critically shaped business practice in the 1790s and ultimately helped to define a capitalist republic. Together, they also help to prove that the actors in this story of market transition were not the independent individuals that figure in the discourse of liberal self-interest. Instead, what they reveal is that dependence and obligation were not conditions confined to women alone, but instead marked all commercial transactions by the end of the eighteenth century. As they tell it, this was what doing ``business like a merchant'' really meant in the early republic. In today's financial climate, it is a story worth remembering. Jo anna Coh en is a lecturer in American history at Queen Mary, University of London and is currently completing a book on the connections between citizenship and consumer culture in the early republic. Revolutionary Conceptions: Women, Fertility, and Family Limitation in America, 1760­1820. By Susan E. Klepp. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009. Pp. 328. Cloth, $65.00; Paper, $24.95.) Reviewed by Anya Jabour ``Procreation is power,'' Susan Klepp asserts in her eagerly awaited study of fertility in revolutionary America, ``but who http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Revolutionary Conceptions: Women, Fertility, and Family Limitation in America, 1760–1820 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (4) – Nov 26, 2010

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2010) continue to prove that women's economic roles critically shaped business practice in the 1790s and ultimately helped to define a capitalist republic. Together, they also help to prove that the actors in this story of market transition were not the independent individuals that figure in the discourse of liberal self-interest. Instead, what they reveal is that dependence and obligation were not conditions confined to women alone, but instead marked all commercial transactions by the end of the eighteenth century. As they tell it, this was what doing ``business like a merchant'' really meant in the early republic. In today's financial climate, it is a story worth remembering. Jo anna Coh en is a lecturer in American history at Queen Mary, University of London and is currently completing a book on the connections between citizenship and consumer culture in the early republic. Revolutionary Conceptions: Women, Fertility, and Family Limitation in America, 1760­1820. By Susan E. Klepp. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009. Pp. 328. Cloth, $65.00; Paper, $24.95.) Reviewed by Anya Jabour ``Procreation is power,'' Susan Klepp asserts in her eagerly awaited study of fertility in revolutionary America, ``but who

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 26, 2010

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