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"Republican Machines": Franklin, Rush, and the Manufacture of Civic Virtue in the Early Republic

"Republican Machines": Franklin, Rush, and the Manufacture of Civic Virtue in the Early Republic ``Republican Machines'' Franklin, Rush, and the Manufacture of Civic Virtue in the Early Republic COLLEEN E. TERRELL Georgia Institute of Technology The Perfectibility of Man! Ah heaven, what a dreary theme! The perfectibility of the Ford car! The perfectibility of which man? I am many men. Which of them are you going to perfect? I am not a mechanical contrivance. --D. H. Lawrence, ``Benjamin Franklin'' -Whatever is, is right Tho' purblind Man Sees but a Part of The Chain, the nearest Link, His Eyes, not carrying to the equal Beam That poizes all, above. --Benjamin Franklin, misquoting Dryden1 In a 1786 essay, ``The Mode of Education Proper in a Republic,'' Philadelphia physician Benjamin Rush famously asserted that he ``consider[ed] it posGenerous support from a Barra Foundation Dissertation Fellowship at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies in 2000­2001 and a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at the UCLA Humanities Consortium in 2002­3 helped make possible both the research and the writing of this piece. I owe many thanks to the participants of both the McNeil Center for Early American Studies Seminar Series and the UCLA Humanities Consortium Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Series for helpful discussions of earlier versions of this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal University of Pennsylvania Press

"Republican Machines": Franklin, Rush, and the Manufacture of Civic Virtue in the Early Republic

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The McNeil Center for Early American Studies. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1559-0895
Publisher site
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Abstract

``Republican Machines'' Franklin, Rush, and the Manufacture of Civic Virtue in the Early Republic COLLEEN E. TERRELL Georgia Institute of Technology The Perfectibility of Man! Ah heaven, what a dreary theme! The perfectibility of the Ford car! The perfectibility of which man? I am many men. Which of them are you going to perfect? I am not a mechanical contrivance. --D. H. Lawrence, ``Benjamin Franklin'' -Whatever is, is right Tho' purblind Man Sees but a Part of The Chain, the nearest Link, His Eyes, not carrying to the equal Beam That poizes all, above. --Benjamin Franklin, misquoting Dryden1 In a 1786 essay, ``The Mode of Education Proper in a Republic,'' Philadelphia physician Benjamin Rush famously asserted that he ``consider[ed] it posGenerous support from a Barra Foundation Dissertation Fellowship at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies in 2000­2001 and a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at the UCLA Humanities Consortium in 2002­3 helped make possible both the research and the writing of this piece. I owe many thanks to the participants of both the McNeil Center for Early American Studies Seminar Series and the UCLA Humanities Consortium Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Series for helpful discussions of earlier versions of this

Journal

Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary JournalUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 23, 2003

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