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Rebels Rising: Cities and the American Revolution (review)

Rebels Rising: Cities and the American Revolution (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2010) Rebels Rising: Cities and the American Revolution. By Benjamin L. Carp. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 334. Cloth, $40.00; Paper, $21.95.) Reviewed by Kyle B. Roberts Benjamin Carp's Rebels Rising is an intriguing study of political mobilization in the spaces of the colonial city on the eve of the American Revolution. It seeks to revitalize the study of cities as centers of revolutionary activity, following up the work of Carl Bridenbaugh a halfcentury ago and Gary Nash a generation later. Carp emphasizes the distinct roles that Boston, Newport, New York, Philadelphia, and Charleston played in the functioning of colonial British America as links between the metropole and the hinterland and as nodes for economic, political, social, and cultural networks. His focus on specific urban spaces as sites of mobilization adds a new facet to our understanding of revolutionary mobilization. Here he takes his cue from--while making his own contribution to--the work of historians as diverse as Elaine Forman Crane, Clare Lyons, and Alfred Young, who have argued for the distinctive experience of early American urban life. In colonial cities, the compact concentration of a pluralistic mix of people fostered http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Rebels Rising: Cities and the American Revolution (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (2) – Apr 28, 2010

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2010) Rebels Rising: Cities and the American Revolution. By Benjamin L. Carp. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 334. Cloth, $40.00; Paper, $21.95.) Reviewed by Kyle B. Roberts Benjamin Carp's Rebels Rising is an intriguing study of political mobilization in the spaces of the colonial city on the eve of the American Revolution. It seeks to revitalize the study of cities as centers of revolutionary activity, following up the work of Carl Bridenbaugh a halfcentury ago and Gary Nash a generation later. Carp emphasizes the distinct roles that Boston, Newport, New York, Philadelphia, and Charleston played in the functioning of colonial British America as links between the metropole and the hinterland and as nodes for economic, political, social, and cultural networks. His focus on specific urban spaces as sites of mobilization adds a new facet to our understanding of revolutionary mobilization. Here he takes his cue from--while making his own contribution to--the work of historians as diverse as Elaine Forman Crane, Clare Lyons, and Alfred Young, who have argued for the distinctive experience of early American urban life. In colonial cities, the compact concentration of a pluralistic mix of people fostered

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 28, 2010

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