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Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787–1788 by Pauline Maier (review)

Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787–1788 by Pauline Maier (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2014) Unlike the American colonists in the 1770s, secessionists saw independence ``as an opportunity to create a more modern economy'' (220). Despite a long tradition of anti-tariff agitation in the antebellum era, Confederate nationalists (particularly those in Virginia) envisioned a tariff on northern goods to protect Virginian industries and generate much needed revenues to shore up the nation's finances. For Quigley, on the other hand, nationalism during the Civil War remade the relationship between state and citizen in the Confederate States. In the crucible of war, the Confederates expanded the power of the state to encompass universal military service through conscription, suspend habeas corpus, and ``exert coercive power over `alien' enemies'' (253). An essay by Brian Balogh on the legacy of American governance closes out State and Citizen. Balogh's essay serves two purposes: to look forward to the twentieth-century welfare/warfare state, and to address contemporary politics. Throughout his essay Balogh argues that nineteenthcentury Americans accepted wide-ranging federal governance as long as it was ``out of sight.'' Thus, he says, ``progressives should also master the art of turning the legal and fiscal resources of the national government toward redistributive ends. In short, they http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787–1788 by Pauline Maier (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (4) – Nov 24, 2014

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2014) Unlike the American colonists in the 1770s, secessionists saw independence ``as an opportunity to create a more modern economy'' (220). Despite a long tradition of anti-tariff agitation in the antebellum era, Confederate nationalists (particularly those in Virginia) envisioned a tariff on northern goods to protect Virginian industries and generate much needed revenues to shore up the nation's finances. For Quigley, on the other hand, nationalism during the Civil War remade the relationship between state and citizen in the Confederate States. In the crucible of war, the Confederates expanded the power of the state to encompass universal military service through conscription, suspend habeas corpus, and ``exert coercive power over `alien' enemies'' (253). An essay by Brian Balogh on the legacy of American governance closes out State and Citizen. Balogh's essay serves two purposes: to look forward to the twentieth-century welfare/warfare state, and to address contemporary politics. Throughout his essay Balogh argues that nineteenthcentury Americans accepted wide-ranging federal governance as long as it was ``out of sight.'' Thus, he says, ``progressives should also master the art of turning the legal and fiscal resources of the national government toward redistributive ends. In short, they

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 24, 2014

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