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Rally the Scattered Believers: Northern New England’s Religious Geography by Shelby M. Balik (review)

Rally the Scattered Believers: Northern New England’s Religious Geography by Shelby M. Balik... JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2015) recently completed a manuscript entitled ``Patriots, Prostitutes, and Spies: Women and the Mexican­American War.'' Rally the Scattered Believers: Northern New England's Religious Geography. By Shelby M. Balik. (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2014. Pp. 295. Cloth, $60.00.) Reviewed by Nathan S. Rives God, it seems, had to fight an uphill battle in northern New England in the early republic. The rugged, mountainous topography of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine isolated settlers from one another and from the religious communities that nurtured their spiritual needs. The region's religious culture, as Shelby Balik explains in her compelling book, was bound to the experience of physical and spiritual space. Significantly, space is not fixed in Balik's ``religious geography.'' Motion across space is equally important, for northern New England was a region of ``restless mobility,'' which its religious culture self-consciously accommodated (1). Using church and town records, the personal writings and correspondence of laity and clergy, books, pamphlets, and religious periodicals, Balik has written an engaging, ground-level religious history with larger implications. Northern New England's religious geography followed two competing spatial models. One was the town church of the region's dominant Congregationalism. Inherited from the colonial http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Rally the Scattered Believers: Northern New England’s Religious Geography by Shelby M. Balik (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 35 (3) – Aug 18, 2015

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2015) recently completed a manuscript entitled ``Patriots, Prostitutes, and Spies: Women and the Mexican­American War.'' Rally the Scattered Believers: Northern New England's Religious Geography. By Shelby M. Balik. (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2014. Pp. 295. Cloth, $60.00.) Reviewed by Nathan S. Rives God, it seems, had to fight an uphill battle in northern New England in the early republic. The rugged, mountainous topography of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine isolated settlers from one another and from the religious communities that nurtured their spiritual needs. The region's religious culture, as Shelby Balik explains in her compelling book, was bound to the experience of physical and spiritual space. Significantly, space is not fixed in Balik's ``religious geography.'' Motion across space is equally important, for northern New England was a region of ``restless mobility,'' which its religious culture self-consciously accommodated (1). Using church and town records, the personal writings and correspondence of laity and clergy, books, pamphlets, and religious periodicals, Balik has written an engaging, ground-level religious history with larger implications. Northern New England's religious geography followed two competing spatial models. One was the town church of the region's dominant Congregationalism. Inherited from the colonial

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 18, 2015

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