Railroads in the Old South: Pursuing Progress in a Slave Society (review)

Railroads in the Old South: Pursuing Progress in a Slave Society (review) REVIEWS couldn't legally enter several of these states in the 1850s. The author's contention that the appropriate comparison is with Kentucky's ferocious laws seems misleading. There is a disconnect between the Democratic politics of most of the region, the pervasive racism of Stephen Douglas and even Lincoln himself, and the heroic local resistance to slave recapture the author recounts. There may be some sociological explanation, but there is an interpretive issue that needs to be resolved. Still, one hardly can fault a work for not doing everything, and Harrold's work does a good deal quite well. But if he is right, historians will still have to puzzle out what it all means. Mi chae l W. Fit zger ald is professor of history at St. Olaf College. He is the author of three books, most recently Splendid Failure: Postwar Reconstruction in the American South (Chicago, 2007). He is currently completing a work on Reconstruction in Alabama. Railroads in the Old South: Pursuing Progress in a Slave Society. By Aaron W. Marrs. (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 2009. Pp. xi, 268. Cloth, $55.00.) Reviewed by Angela Lakwete Driving a nail into the coffin of southern exceptionalism, Aaron Marrs argues http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Railroads in the Old South: Pursuing Progress in a Slave Society (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 32 (1) – Feb 8, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS couldn't legally enter several of these states in the 1850s. The author's contention that the appropriate comparison is with Kentucky's ferocious laws seems misleading. There is a disconnect between the Democratic politics of most of the region, the pervasive racism of Stephen Douglas and even Lincoln himself, and the heroic local resistance to slave recapture the author recounts. There may be some sociological explanation, but there is an interpretive issue that needs to be resolved. Still, one hardly can fault a work for not doing everything, and Harrold's work does a good deal quite well. But if he is right, historians will still have to puzzle out what it all means. Mi chae l W. Fit zger ald is professor of history at St. Olaf College. He is the author of three books, most recently Splendid Failure: Postwar Reconstruction in the American South (Chicago, 2007). He is currently completing a work on Reconstruction in Alabama. Railroads in the Old South: Pursuing Progress in a Slave Society. By Aaron W. Marrs. (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 2009. Pp. xi, 268. Cloth, $55.00.) Reviewed by Angela Lakwete Driving a nail into the coffin of southern exceptionalism, Aaron Marrs argues

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 8, 2012

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