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Radical Hospitality and Political Intimacy in Grahamite Boardinghouses, 1830–1850

Radical Hospitality and Political Intimacy in Grahamite Boardinghouses, 1830–1850 Radical Hospitality and Political Intimacy in Grahamite Boardinghouses, 1830–1850 APRIL HAYNES After enduring three days of crowded steamboats, segregated cars, and rutted roads, three hundred travel-weary abolitionists filed slowly toward their appointed meeting place in May of 1840 only to meet a menacing crowd. Residents of New York City’s fourth ward lined Franklin Street to jeer the unwelcome arrivals. Familiar with such epi- sodes, the antislavery delegation from New England moved with prac- ticed calm toward St. John’s Hotel. Urban boardinghouses overflowed with reformers during each anniversary week in the 1830s and 1840s, inundating the scarce lodging spaces otherwise accessible to abolition- ists. Added to these usual pressures, the Garrisonian contingent also anticipated an exceptionally ugly battle among fellow abolitionists at the annual meeting of the American Anti-Slavery Society. The cresting debate over women’s full membership in antislavery organizations had attracted, according to one observer, “far greater numbers” of activists than had attended prior conventions. The Franklin Street crowd had been summoned by a white man who April Haynes is associate professor of history at the University of Wisconsin– Madison. She wishes to thank Christy Clark-Pujara, Patricia Cline Cohen, Thulani Davis, Christina Greene, Gary Kornblith, Michelle McKinley, Brenda Gayle http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Radical Hospitality and Political Intimacy in Grahamite Boardinghouses, 1830–1850

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 39 (3) – Aug 9, 2019

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

Radical Hospitality and Political Intimacy in Grahamite Boardinghouses, 1830–1850 APRIL HAYNES After enduring three days of crowded steamboats, segregated cars, and rutted roads, three hundred travel-weary abolitionists filed slowly toward their appointed meeting place in May of 1840 only to meet a menacing crowd. Residents of New York City’s fourth ward lined Franklin Street to jeer the unwelcome arrivals. Familiar with such epi- sodes, the antislavery delegation from New England moved with prac- ticed calm toward St. John’s Hotel. Urban boardinghouses overflowed with reformers during each anniversary week in the 1830s and 1840s, inundating the scarce lodging spaces otherwise accessible to abolition- ists. Added to these usual pressures, the Garrisonian contingent also anticipated an exceptionally ugly battle among fellow abolitionists at the annual meeting of the American Anti-Slavery Society. The cresting debate over women’s full membership in antislavery organizations had attracted, according to one observer, “far greater numbers” of activists than had attended prior conventions. The Franklin Street crowd had been summoned by a white man who April Haynes is associate professor of history at the University of Wisconsin– Madison. She wishes to thank Christy Clark-Pujara, Patricia Cline Cohen, Thulani Davis, Christina Greene, Gary Kornblith, Michelle McKinley, Brenda Gayle

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 9, 2019

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