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Race, Revolution, and the Sublime: The Gothicization of the Haitian Revolution in the New Republic and Atlantic World

Race, Revolution, and the Sublime: The Gothicization of the Haitian Revolution in the New... Race, Rebellion, and the Gothic Inventing the Haitian Revolution M AT T C L AV I N University of West Florida We have to contemplate the human mind in its utmost deformity: to behold savage man, let loose from restraint, exercising cruelties, of which the bare recital makes the heart recoil, and committing crimes which are hitherto unheard of in history. --Bryan Edwards, An Historical Survey of the French Colony in the Island of St. Domingo (1806) Just months after tearing the white stripe from the tricolored French flag and declaring Haiti a free and independent black nation, Jean-Jacques Dessalines, the former slave and future emperor who rose to power in the wake of the arrest and death of Toussaint Louverture, ordered the massacre of nearly all the new nation's remaining white population.1 The gruesome act concluded The following made this article possible through their generous support: American University, Cosmos Club, American Antiquarian Society, Library Company of Philadelphia, and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. I would especially like to thank those who offered ideas and support at the McNeil Center's Twenty-fifth Anniversary Graduate Conference, ``Roots and Routes in Early America,'' and those who read drafts of the article http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal University of Pennsylvania Press

Race, Revolution, and the Sublime: The Gothicization of the Haitian Revolution in the New Republic and Atlantic World

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 The McNeil Center for Early American Studies. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1559-0895
Publisher site
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Abstract

Race, Rebellion, and the Gothic Inventing the Haitian Revolution M AT T C L AV I N University of West Florida We have to contemplate the human mind in its utmost deformity: to behold savage man, let loose from restraint, exercising cruelties, of which the bare recital makes the heart recoil, and committing crimes which are hitherto unheard of in history. --Bryan Edwards, An Historical Survey of the French Colony in the Island of St. Domingo (1806) Just months after tearing the white stripe from the tricolored French flag and declaring Haiti a free and independent black nation, Jean-Jacques Dessalines, the former slave and future emperor who rose to power in the wake of the arrest and death of Toussaint Louverture, ordered the massacre of nearly all the new nation's remaining white population.1 The gruesome act concluded The following made this article possible through their generous support: American University, Cosmos Club, American Antiquarian Society, Library Company of Philadelphia, and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. I would especially like to thank those who offered ideas and support at the McNeil Center's Twenty-fifth Anniversary Graduate Conference, ``Roots and Routes in Early America,'' and those who read drafts of the article

Journal

Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary JournalUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 3, 2007

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