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Race Horse Men: How Slavery and Freedom Were Made at the Racetrack by Katherine C. Mooney (review)

Race Horse Men: How Slavery and Freedom Were Made at the Racetrack by Katherine C. Mooney (review) REVIEWS mentioning. While some historians might appreciate the book's introduction, which provides a historiographical review of previous interpretations of Benton, a shorter summary that concisely presents Mueller's argument might have been more effective. Additionally, in the first two chapters, Benton fades into the background far too often as Mueller provides historical context, much of which seems unnecessary given his intention of not providing a complete biographical study of the Missouri senator's life. Mueller introduces Benton by calling him ``the greatest Jacksonian lawmaker of the era.'' ``No Democratic legislator of the period,'' he continues, ``can compare, in terms of either influence or longevity'' (2). While Benton had plenty of help in constructing the early republic's ``master race democracy,'' it is hard to argue with Mueller's overall assessment of the Missourian's importance in shaping antebellum political debates. Ma rk R. Che ath em is an associate professor of history at Cumberland University. He is currently completing two books on early republic politics: Andrew Jackson and the Rise of the Democrats and The Log Cabin and Hard Cider Campaign of 1840: Politics as Entertainment in Antebellum America. Race Horse Men: How Slavery and Freedom Were Made at the Racetrack. By Katherine http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Race Horse Men: How Slavery and Freedom Were Made at the Racetrack by Katherine C. Mooney (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 35 (2) – Apr 29, 2015

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS mentioning. While some historians might appreciate the book's introduction, which provides a historiographical review of previous interpretations of Benton, a shorter summary that concisely presents Mueller's argument might have been more effective. Additionally, in the first two chapters, Benton fades into the background far too often as Mueller provides historical context, much of which seems unnecessary given his intention of not providing a complete biographical study of the Missouri senator's life. Mueller introduces Benton by calling him ``the greatest Jacksonian lawmaker of the era.'' ``No Democratic legislator of the period,'' he continues, ``can compare, in terms of either influence or longevity'' (2). While Benton had plenty of help in constructing the early republic's ``master race democracy,'' it is hard to argue with Mueller's overall assessment of the Missourian's importance in shaping antebellum political debates. Ma rk R. Che ath em is an associate professor of history at Cumberland University. He is currently completing two books on early republic politics: Andrew Jackson and the Rise of the Democrats and The Log Cabin and Hard Cider Campaign of 1840: Politics as Entertainment in Antebellum America. Race Horse Men: How Slavery and Freedom Were Made at the Racetrack. By Katherine

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 29, 2015

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