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Quakers Living in the Lion’s Mouth: The Society of Friends in Northern Virginia, 1730–1865 by A. Glenn Crothers (review)

Quakers Living in the Lion’s Mouth: The Society of Friends in Northern Virginia, 1730–1865 by A.... JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2014) coverage of the comparatively small free inquiry movement after 1820. That said, historians often overlook the free inquiry movement, and Schlereth remedies that neglect. In the 1790s, as Schlereth notes, some Americans began to see ``the radical contingency at the center of both political loyalty and religious faith'' (77). If this recognition undermined faith in natural reason as much as it did faith in biblical revelation, evangelicals were more adamant in their refusal to face radical contingency, and more effective in defending revelation than deists were in arguing against it. Put differently, evangelicals were more defensive with respect to interpreting reality than deists and free thinkers, and more militant overall because of their defensiveness. Opposing political constructions of religion developed together in the early republic, as Schlereth convincingly shows, but not with equivalent resistance to criticism. Am anda Por ter fiel d is the Robert A. Spivey Professor of Religion at Florida State University. She is the author of Conceived in Doubt: Religion and Politics in Early America (Chicago, 2012), and currently researches corporate organizing in the early republic. Quakers Living in the Lion's Mouth: The Society of Friends in Northern http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Quakers Living in the Lion’s Mouth: The Society of Friends in Northern Virginia, 1730–1865 by A. Glenn Crothers (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (1) – Jan 28, 2014

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2014) coverage of the comparatively small free inquiry movement after 1820. That said, historians often overlook the free inquiry movement, and Schlereth remedies that neglect. In the 1790s, as Schlereth notes, some Americans began to see ``the radical contingency at the center of both political loyalty and religious faith'' (77). If this recognition undermined faith in natural reason as much as it did faith in biblical revelation, evangelicals were more adamant in their refusal to face radical contingency, and more effective in defending revelation than deists were in arguing against it. Put differently, evangelicals were more defensive with respect to interpreting reality than deists and free thinkers, and more militant overall because of their defensiveness. Opposing political constructions of religion developed together in the early republic, as Schlereth convincingly shows, but not with equivalent resistance to criticism. Am anda Por ter fiel d is the Robert A. Spivey Professor of Religion at Florida State University. She is the author of Conceived in Doubt: Religion and Politics in Early America (Chicago, 2012), and currently researches corporate organizing in the early republic. Quakers Living in the Lion's Mouth: The Society of Friends in Northern

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jan 28, 2014

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