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Quaker Constitutionalism and the Political Thought of John Dickinson (review)

Quaker Constitutionalism and the Political Thought of John Dickinson (review) REVIEWS Fathers and then generations of American historians denied the role of miscegenation played in the creation of New World societies,'' writes Walker, ``suggests how deeply disturbing the idea of a mixed-race state is to the American conception of moral nationhood'' (23). Walker's second chapter considers how the pre- and post-DNA interpretations of the Jefferson­Hemings relationship have shaped and were shaped by American racial attitudes and identity. He observes, ``The debate about Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings has always been about national identity or who we are. This was true in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and will continue to be true well into the twenty-first'' (96). Mongrel Nation is a deliberately provocative book. It ranges widely across two centuries of history, historiography, and literature. It argues powerfully that race is central to American identity and that the battles within and over American history are often about contemporary questions concerning race and national identity. Mongrel Nation is a small book dealing with big questions. It is an important book that goes to the heart of historical study and it deserves a wide readership. The Founding Fathers Reconsidered persuasively demonstrates that the founding fathers need to be understood on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Quaker Constitutionalism and the Political Thought of John Dickinson (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (4) – Nov 26, 2010

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
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Abstract

REVIEWS Fathers and then generations of American historians denied the role of miscegenation played in the creation of New World societies,'' writes Walker, ``suggests how deeply disturbing the idea of a mixed-race state is to the American conception of moral nationhood'' (23). Walker's second chapter considers how the pre- and post-DNA interpretations of the Jefferson­Hemings relationship have shaped and were shaped by American racial attitudes and identity. He observes, ``The debate about Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings has always been about national identity or who we are. This was true in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and will continue to be true well into the twenty-first'' (96). Mongrel Nation is a deliberately provocative book. It ranges widely across two centuries of history, historiography, and literature. It argues powerfully that race is central to American identity and that the battles within and over American history are often about contemporary questions concerning race and national identity. Mongrel Nation is a small book dealing with big questions. It is an important book that goes to the heart of historical study and it deserves a wide readership. The Founding Fathers Reconsidered persuasively demonstrates that the founding fathers need to be understood on

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 26, 2010

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