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Preface. Re-Envisioning Early Modern Iberia: Visuality, Materiality, History

Preface. Re-Envisioning Early Modern Iberia: Visuality, Materiality, History The essays collected in this special issue of Hispanic Review were first presented at a symposium at the University of Pennsylvania on February 15, 2008, where they were followed by the roundtable ``Grounding Interdisciplinarity.'' Probing the boundaries of the field, this volume includes some of the most exciting new directions in early modern Hispanic studies. The essays collected here are not just interdisciplinary but intellectually expansive: they take as their purview the culture of the early modern Hispanic world without dividing it up according to our own anachronistic paradigms. These critics look broadly at textual, pictorial, cartographic, and material representations. They engage closely with the period's multifaceted imaginary, recovering the considerable ideological force that shaped even the most ´ ``objective'' of representations, as in Ricardo Padron's study of the cartographic creation of a Hispanic Pacific Ocean. They probe in a highly selfconscious manner the problems attendant upon writing marginal histories, or the histories of figures marginalized by the canon, such as the black freedman poet Juan Latino, in Elizabeth Wright's essay, or, in Karina Galperin's, the much-maligned Dido, queen of Carthage. They recover urban practices, such as the tapado, anatomized here by Amanda Wunder and Laura Bass, or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hispanic Review University of Pennsylvania Press

Preface. Re-Envisioning Early Modern Iberia: Visuality, Materiality, History

Hispanic Review , Volume 77 (1) – Feb 26, 2008

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0639
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Abstract

The essays collected in this special issue of Hispanic Review were first presented at a symposium at the University of Pennsylvania on February 15, 2008, where they were followed by the roundtable ``Grounding Interdisciplinarity.'' Probing the boundaries of the field, this volume includes some of the most exciting new directions in early modern Hispanic studies. The essays collected here are not just interdisciplinary but intellectually expansive: they take as their purview the culture of the early modern Hispanic world without dividing it up according to our own anachronistic paradigms. These critics look broadly at textual, pictorial, cartographic, and material representations. They engage closely with the period's multifaceted imaginary, recovering the considerable ideological force that shaped even the most ´ ``objective'' of representations, as in Ricardo Padron's study of the cartographic creation of a Hispanic Pacific Ocean. They probe in a highly selfconscious manner the problems attendant upon writing marginal histories, or the histories of figures marginalized by the canon, such as the black freedman poet Juan Latino, in Elizabeth Wright's essay, or, in Karina Galperin's, the much-maligned Dido, queen of Carthage. They recover urban practices, such as the tapado, anatomized here by Amanda Wunder and Laura Bass, or

Journal

Hispanic ReviewUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 26, 2008

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