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Plato's Ghost: Spiritualism in the American Renaissance (review)

Plato's Ghost: Spiritualism in the American Renaissance (review) scripts, and would have provided identifications of many of the texts accompanying the SA: for example, the Arras manuscript that opens the list (pp. 221­22) includes Plato of Tivoli's translation of the Quadripartitum of Ptolemy and Abu Ma`shar's book De magnis coniunctionibus (Hendrix does not recognize either of these works); Erfurt, Amploniana Q 348 (pp. 245­46) contains a ``canonium simetrum magnitudine,'' not a ``canonem similem magnitudine'' and Thabit ibn Qurra's De motu accessionis et recessionis (an astronomical work), not his De imaginibus (on talismans), which Hendrix may have been led into believing merely because the text begins with ``Imaginabor''; Alcabitius did not write a commentary on the Quadripartitum of Ptolemy (p. 245); and the work referred to in Erfurt Q 348 is simply another copy of the frequently occurring Introduction to Astrology of Alcabitius. It is difficult to find one's way round the manuscripts, which are grouped according to whether they were used by astrologers or doctors (an artificial dichotomy), but an order is not always preserved within each of these divisions (Munich, clm 27 comes after 227, BNF 7335 comes after BNF 7440). Hendrix relies on this analysis of the manuscripts in Chapter 4, where the dates http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft University of Pennsylvania Press

Plato's Ghost: Spiritualism in the American Renaissance (review)

Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft , Volume 7 (2) – Nov 10, 2012

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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The University of Pennsylvania Press
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1940-5111
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Abstract

scripts, and would have provided identifications of many of the texts accompanying the SA: for example, the Arras manuscript that opens the list (pp. 221­22) includes Plato of Tivoli's translation of the Quadripartitum of Ptolemy and Abu Ma`shar's book De magnis coniunctionibus (Hendrix does not recognize either of these works); Erfurt, Amploniana Q 348 (pp. 245­46) contains a ``canonium simetrum magnitudine,'' not a ``canonem similem magnitudine'' and Thabit ibn Qurra's De motu accessionis et recessionis (an astronomical work), not his De imaginibus (on talismans), which Hendrix may have been led into believing merely because the text begins with ``Imaginabor''; Alcabitius did not write a commentary on the Quadripartitum of Ptolemy (p. 245); and the work referred to in Erfurt Q 348 is simply another copy of the frequently occurring Introduction to Astrology of Alcabitius. It is difficult to find one's way round the manuscripts, which are grouped according to whether they were used by astrologers or doctors (an artificial dichotomy), but an order is not always preserved within each of these divisions (Munich, clm 27 comes after 227, BNF 7335 comes after BNF 7440). Hendrix relies on this analysis of the manuscripts in Chapter 4, where the dates

Journal

Magic, Ritual, and WitchcraftUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 10, 2012

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