Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Panic, State Power, and Chickasaw Dispossession

Panic, State Power, and Chickasaw Dispossession <p>Abstract (Lang: English):</p><p>Historians of the early republic all too often overlook how Indigenous peoples figured in the nation’s political economy. The artificial isolation of Native history from accounts of fiscal policy and economic development is all the more glaring in President Andrew Jackson’s era: In scholarship, survey courses, and textbooks, Jackson’s infamous Bank War and his protracted Indian Wars, especially Indian removal, appear as discrete units. By tracing the interwoven histories of federal fiscal policy, state banking, and Chickasaw dispossession, this essay examines the critical role of governments in claiming Indigenous homelands and engineering the speculative markets that spun out from the treaty process. It situates the Panic of 1819 – along with the later Panic of 1837 – as crises rooted in the characteristically extensive expansion of a settler economy.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Panic, State Power, and Chickasaw Dispossession

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 40 (4) – Nov 12, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/panic-state-power-and-chickasaw-dispossession-8Qoa301x90
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

<p>Abstract (Lang: English):</p><p>Historians of the early republic all too often overlook how Indigenous peoples figured in the nation’s political economy. The artificial isolation of Native history from accounts of fiscal policy and economic development is all the more glaring in President Andrew Jackson’s era: In scholarship, survey courses, and textbooks, Jackson’s infamous Bank War and his protracted Indian Wars, especially Indian removal, appear as discrete units. By tracing the interwoven histories of federal fiscal policy, state banking, and Chickasaw dispossession, this essay examines the critical role of governments in claiming Indigenous homelands and engineering the speculative markets that spun out from the treaty process. It situates the Panic of 1819 – along with the later Panic of 1837 – as crises rooted in the characteristically extensive expansion of a settler economy.</p>

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 12, 2020

There are no references for this article.