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On the Make: Clerks and the Quest for Capital in Nineteenth-Century America (review)

On the Make: Clerks and the Quest for Capital in Nineteenth-Century America (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2011) the Burns rendition, the ``votaries of higher law'' were on full display in the trial of the Oberlin defendants (274). Fugitive Justice is a work of synthesis drawing upon the research of Robert Cover, Thomas Morris, Thomas Slaughter, Albert Von Frank, Leonard Levy, Nat Brandt, and Paul Finkelman, to name a few scholars whose works are repeatedly cited. Lubet relies heavily on the four volumes relating to fugitive slaves in the courtroom contained in Finkelman's invaluable edited work, Slavery, Race and the American Legal System 1700­1872 (New York, 1981). Fugitive Justice is likely to both frustrate and delight scholars of the period. For those who teach courses on the Civil War, the book will be a hit with an undergraduate audience because of its fast-paced narrative. However, scholars will likely be infuriated at Lubet's failure to engage with Civil War-era historiography, contemporary newspapers, and relevant manuscript material. Lubet's book clearly has a lot to offer in terms of forcing scholars to rethink the importance of the fugitive slave trials in the development of party ideology. However, the author makes no attempt to deal with this question or the complicated linkage between http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

On the Make: Clerks and the Quest for Capital in Nineteenth-Century America (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (3) – Aug 11, 2011

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2011) the Burns rendition, the ``votaries of higher law'' were on full display in the trial of the Oberlin defendants (274). Fugitive Justice is a work of synthesis drawing upon the research of Robert Cover, Thomas Morris, Thomas Slaughter, Albert Von Frank, Leonard Levy, Nat Brandt, and Paul Finkelman, to name a few scholars whose works are repeatedly cited. Lubet relies heavily on the four volumes relating to fugitive slaves in the courtroom contained in Finkelman's invaluable edited work, Slavery, Race and the American Legal System 1700­1872 (New York, 1981). Fugitive Justice is likely to both frustrate and delight scholars of the period. For those who teach courses on the Civil War, the book will be a hit with an undergraduate audience because of its fast-paced narrative. However, scholars will likely be infuriated at Lubet's failure to engage with Civil War-era historiography, contemporary newspapers, and relevant manuscript material. Lubet's book clearly has a lot to offer in terms of forcing scholars to rethink the importance of the fugitive slave trials in the development of party ideology. However, the author makes no attempt to deal with this question or the complicated linkage between

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 11, 2011

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