Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Oceans of Wine: Madeira and the Emergence of American Trade and Taste (review)

Oceans of Wine: Madeira and the Emergence of American Trade and Taste (review) tion, ``An Incarcerated Republic: Prisoners, Reformers, and the Penitentiary in the Early United States, 1790­1860,'' which analyzes the actions of prisoners and daily life inside Pennsylvania and New York state prisons. Oceans of Wine: Madeira and the Emergence of American Trade and Taste. By David Hancock. (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2009. Pp. 680. Cloth, $50.00.) Reviewed by Cathy Matson David Hancock's enthusiasm for the world of Madeira wine began many years ago when he somewhat fortuitously discovered a massive cache of export records in the small Portuguese town of Funchal, on the island for which the wine is named. But if the narrative begins there, it quickly encompasses much more. Hancock weaves an intricate and fascinating portrait of the economy and culture of a luxury drink that made its mark on almost every corner of the Atlantic world from 1650 to 1815. He reconstructs the ``commodity chain'' of Madeira from vineyards to production, into Atlantic commerce, through warehouses and retail shops, through the technologies and material culture of wine, and onto consumers' tables--from grape to glass. As Hancock takes the reader from the island, into the Atlantic, and through North American port cities into the frontier, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Oceans of Wine: Madeira and the Emergence of American Trade and Taste (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (4) – Nov 26, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/oceans-of-wine-madeira-and-the-emergence-of-american-trade-and-taste-LUwtWsuAdw
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

tion, ``An Incarcerated Republic: Prisoners, Reformers, and the Penitentiary in the Early United States, 1790­1860,'' which analyzes the actions of prisoners and daily life inside Pennsylvania and New York state prisons. Oceans of Wine: Madeira and the Emergence of American Trade and Taste. By David Hancock. (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2009. Pp. 680. Cloth, $50.00.) Reviewed by Cathy Matson David Hancock's enthusiasm for the world of Madeira wine began many years ago when he somewhat fortuitously discovered a massive cache of export records in the small Portuguese town of Funchal, on the island for which the wine is named. But if the narrative begins there, it quickly encompasses much more. Hancock weaves an intricate and fascinating portrait of the economy and culture of a luxury drink that made its mark on almost every corner of the Atlantic world from 1650 to 1815. He reconstructs the ``commodity chain'' of Madeira from vineyards to production, into Atlantic commerce, through warehouses and retail shops, through the technologies and material culture of wine, and onto consumers' tables--from grape to glass. As Hancock takes the reader from the island, into the Atlantic, and through North American port cities into the frontier,

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 26, 2010

There are no references for this article.