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No Turning Point: The Saratoga Campaign in Perspective by Theodore Corbett (review)

No Turning Point: The Saratoga Campaign in Perspective by Theodore Corbett (review) R EVIEWS EDITED BY ANDREW BURSTEIN AND NANCY ISENBERG No Turning Point: The Saratoga Campaign in Perspective. By Theodore Corbett. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2012. Pp. xii 436. Cloth, $39.95.) Reviewed by Benjamin L. Carp Anyone with a passing knowledge of the Revolutionary War remembers the Saratoga campaign of 1777 as a key turning point. The British surrender on October 17 exposed John Burgoyne and William Howe as failed military commanders; it ruined the Crown's best chance to drive a wedge between New England and the Middle Colonies and bolstered French confidence in the American rebellion. The perennial emphasis on Saratoga reflects traditional historians' preference for focusing on the machinations of statesmen and the military campaigns of senior commanders. Theodore Corbett insists that we revisit this conventional wisdom. It's not that he thinks these conclusions are wrong--in fact, he spends almost no time on diplomacy or on the British ministry's overall direction of the war effort. Instead, he hopes to refocus our attention on ``the regional war that surrounded and penetrated the Saratoga battlefields'' (369), essentially the Hudson­Champlain region north of Albany, just east of the areas covered in Alan Taylor's The Divided Ground: Indians, Settlers, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

No Turning Point: The Saratoga Campaign in Perspective by Theodore Corbett (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 33 (3) – Jul 5, 2013

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

R EVIEWS EDITED BY ANDREW BURSTEIN AND NANCY ISENBERG No Turning Point: The Saratoga Campaign in Perspective. By Theodore Corbett. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2012. Pp. xii 436. Cloth, $39.95.) Reviewed by Benjamin L. Carp Anyone with a passing knowledge of the Revolutionary War remembers the Saratoga campaign of 1777 as a key turning point. The British surrender on October 17 exposed John Burgoyne and William Howe as failed military commanders; it ruined the Crown's best chance to drive a wedge between New England and the Middle Colonies and bolstered French confidence in the American rebellion. The perennial emphasis on Saratoga reflects traditional historians' preference for focusing on the machinations of statesmen and the military campaigns of senior commanders. Theodore Corbett insists that we revisit this conventional wisdom. It's not that he thinks these conclusions are wrong--in fact, he spends almost no time on diplomacy or on the British ministry's overall direction of the war effort. Instead, he hopes to refocus our attention on ``the regional war that surrounded and penetrated the Saratoga battlefields'' (369), essentially the Hudson­Champlain region north of Albany, just east of the areas covered in Alan Taylor's The Divided Ground: Indians, Settlers, and

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jul 5, 2013

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