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No One Who Reads the History of Hayti Can Doubt the Capacity of Colored Men: Racial Formation and Atlantic Rehabilitation in New York City's Early Black Press, 1827-1841

No One Who Reads the History of Hayti Can Doubt the Capacity of Colored Men: Racial Formation and... Abstract: From 1827 to 1841 the black newspapers Freedom's Journal and the Colored American of New York City were venues for one of the first significant racial projects in the United States. To counter aspersions against their race, the editors of these publications renegotiated their community's identity within the matrix of the Black Atlantic away from waning discourses of a collective African past. First, Freedom's Journal used the Haitian Revolution to exemplify resistance, abolitionism, and autonomy. The Colored American later projected the Republic of Haiti as a model of governance, prosperity, and refinement to serve this community's own evolving ambitions of citizenship, inclusion, and rights. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal University of Pennsylvania Press

No One Who Reads the History of Hayti Can Doubt the Capacity of Colored Men: Racial Formation and Atlantic Rehabilitation in New York City's Early Black Press, 1827-1841

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 The McNeil Center for Early American Studies.
ISSN
1559-0895
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: From 1827 to 1841 the black newspapers Freedom's Journal and the Colored American of New York City were venues for one of the first significant racial projects in the United States. To counter aspersions against their race, the editors of these publications renegotiated their community's identity within the matrix of the Black Atlantic away from waning discourses of a collective African past. First, Freedom's Journal used the Haitian Revolution to exemplify resistance, abolitionism, and autonomy. The Colored American later projected the Republic of Haiti as a model of governance, prosperity, and refinement to serve this community's own evolving ambitions of citizenship, inclusion, and rights.

Journal

Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary JournalUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 24, 2013

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