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New Ways Out: Reaching Beyond the Academy and the Coast

New Ways Out: Reaching Beyond the Academy and the Coast New Ways Out: Reaching Beyond the Academy and the Coast WOODY H OLTON Although Kathleen DuVal’s Independence Lost focuses on the Gulf Coast, while Alan Taylor’s American Revolutions tackles the entire American Revolution, the two overlap more than enough to merit com- parison. Both seek to complicate our collective memory of Patriots fight- ing Redcoats by also seeking to convey the perspectives of Loyalists, African Americans, women (kindling hopes that the upcoming sestercen- tennnial will also be a sistercentennnial), and Native Americans. The friendly ghost of Richard White looms over both authors, each of whom responded to his Middle Ground in the title of a previous book, Taylor’s Divided Ground and DuVal’s Native Ground. Like White, DuVal calls her chapter on the 1780s “Confederacies”; Taylor discusses the same decade under the rubric “Confederations.” In what may be their two most significant similarities, American Revo- lutions and Independence Lost emphasize the same region and target the same audience. Publishing with commercial, not academic, presses, both authors seek to reach beyond academia. Yet, unlike most trade books on the American Revolutionary era, both range far beyond “the thirteen colonies,” especially to the regions south of Georgia and west of the Appalachian http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

New Ways Out: Reaching Beyond the Academy and the Coast

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 39 (3) – Aug 9, 2019

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

New Ways Out: Reaching Beyond the Academy and the Coast WOODY H OLTON Although Kathleen DuVal’s Independence Lost focuses on the Gulf Coast, while Alan Taylor’s American Revolutions tackles the entire American Revolution, the two overlap more than enough to merit com- parison. Both seek to complicate our collective memory of Patriots fight- ing Redcoats by also seeking to convey the perspectives of Loyalists, African Americans, women (kindling hopes that the upcoming sestercen- tennnial will also be a sistercentennnial), and Native Americans. The friendly ghost of Richard White looms over both authors, each of whom responded to his Middle Ground in the title of a previous book, Taylor’s Divided Ground and DuVal’s Native Ground. Like White, DuVal calls her chapter on the 1780s “Confederacies”; Taylor discusses the same decade under the rubric “Confederations.” In what may be their two most significant similarities, American Revo- lutions and Independence Lost emphasize the same region and target the same audience. Publishing with commercial, not academic, presses, both authors seek to reach beyond academia. Yet, unlike most trade books on the American Revolutionary era, both range far beyond “the thirteen colonies,” especially to the regions south of Georgia and west of the Appalachian

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 9, 2019

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