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Native Tongues: Colonialism and Race from Encounter to the Reservation by Sean P. Harvey (review)

Native Tongues: Colonialism and Race from Encounter to the Reservation by Sean P. Harvey (review) REVIEWS ¨ Gu nlo g Fur is professor of history at Linnaeus University, Sweden, and Research Director for Linnaeus University Centre: Concurrences in Colonial and Postcolonial Studies. Author of A Nation of Women: Gender and Colonial Encounters among the Delaware Indians (Philadelphia, 2009), she is currently researching the concurrent and entangled histories of Scandinavian immigrants and Native Americans. Native Tongues: Colonialism and Race from Encounter to the Reservation. By Sean P. Harvey. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015. Pp. 338. Cloth, $39.95.) Reviewed by Phillip Round Writing in the early decades of the twentieth century, eminent linguist Edward Sapir observed, ``if we can once thoroughly convince ourselves that race . . . is supremely indifferent to the history of languages . . . we shall have gained a viewpoint . . . that quite refuses to be taken in by . . . Anglo-Saxondom, Teutonism and the Latin genius.''1 Sapir could speak with such authority because he enjoyed a unique perspective on the subject. His view was born of thirty-five years of field work in Native American languages and a healthy skepticism derived from living through the late nineteenth century's morass of racialist nationalisms-- both in his native http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Native Tongues: Colonialism and Race from Encounter to the Reservation by Sean P. Harvey (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 36 (1) – Feb 25, 2016

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS ¨ Gu nlo g Fur is professor of history at Linnaeus University, Sweden, and Research Director for Linnaeus University Centre: Concurrences in Colonial and Postcolonial Studies. Author of A Nation of Women: Gender and Colonial Encounters among the Delaware Indians (Philadelphia, 2009), she is currently researching the concurrent and entangled histories of Scandinavian immigrants and Native Americans. Native Tongues: Colonialism and Race from Encounter to the Reservation. By Sean P. Harvey. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015. Pp. 338. Cloth, $39.95.) Reviewed by Phillip Round Writing in the early decades of the twentieth century, eminent linguist Edward Sapir observed, ``if we can once thoroughly convince ourselves that race . . . is supremely indifferent to the history of languages . . . we shall have gained a viewpoint . . . that quite refuses to be taken in by . . . Anglo-Saxondom, Teutonism and the Latin genius.''1 Sapir could speak with such authority because he enjoyed a unique perspective on the subject. His view was born of thirty-five years of field work in Native American languages and a healthy skepticism derived from living through the late nineteenth century's morass of racialist nationalisms-- both in his native

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 25, 2016

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