Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Native Americans, Christianity, and the Reshaping of the American Religious Landscape (review)

Native Americans, Christianity, and the Reshaping of the American Religious Landscape (review) REVIEWS tribes and divide or auction their reserves. In his Epilogue, Mandell describes how the descendants of terminated tribes remained on or near their former reserves, kept cultural practices alive, and formed panIndian connections in the 1920s. The Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 had a revitalizing effect on many tribes, nearly all whom sought federal recognition in the 1970s. A particular strength of this book is its attention to the shared experiences of Indians and their black and white neighbors, who formed a transient class of laboring poor that played a significant role in the industrial and agrarian development of southern New England. Discussion of the shared experience of enslavement that inaugurated these relationships would have made this aspect of the book even stronger. Covering one half-century in each of two sets of three thematic chapters makes following the chronology of events across themes a little confusing, and there are a couple of insignificant factual errors. Overall, this is a wonderfully complex and thoughtful portrait of an important century of Native life in New England. Jo anne Pop e Me l ish is an associate professor of history at the University of Kentucky. She is the author of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Native Americans, Christianity, and the Reshaping of the American Religious Landscape (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (4) – Nov 5, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/native-americans-christianity-and-the-reshaping-of-the-american-nvivctdWee
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS tribes and divide or auction their reserves. In his Epilogue, Mandell describes how the descendants of terminated tribes remained on or near their former reserves, kept cultural practices alive, and formed panIndian connections in the 1920s. The Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 had a revitalizing effect on many tribes, nearly all whom sought federal recognition in the 1970s. A particular strength of this book is its attention to the shared experiences of Indians and their black and white neighbors, who formed a transient class of laboring poor that played a significant role in the industrial and agrarian development of southern New England. Discussion of the shared experience of enslavement that inaugurated these relationships would have made this aspect of the book even stronger. Covering one half-century in each of two sets of three thematic chapters makes following the chronology of events across themes a little confusing, and there are a couple of insignificant factual errors. Overall, this is a wonderfully complex and thoughtful portrait of an important century of Native life in New England. Jo anne Pop e Me l ish is an associate professor of history at the University of Kentucky. She is the author of

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 5, 2011

There are no references for this article.