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Nationalism in Europe & America: Politics, Cultures, and Identities Since 1775 by Lloyd S. Kramer (review)

Nationalism in Europe & America: Politics, Cultures, and Identities Since 1775 by Lloyd S. Kramer... R EVIEWS EDITED BY ANDREW BURSTEIN AND NANCY ISENBERG Nationalism in Europe & America: Politics, Cultures, and Identities Since 1775. By Lloyd S. Kramer. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 2011. Pp. 272. Cloth, $65.00.) Reviewed by Johann Neem In Nationalism in Europe & America, a revised and updated version of a book first published in 1998, Lloyd S. Kramer offers a broad, wellargued introduction to the literature on the history of nationalism. Kramer makes two main arguments. First, nationalism--the idea that states should represent culturally unified peoples--is a modern invention. Second, nationalism is a cultural force that speaks to human beings' deep yearning to be connected to something outside themselves. Both claims are well argued and provocative, and challenge other scholars. The first claim is intended to challenge those who believe that nationalism's roots lie in the mists of time. Kramer is not claiming that shared cultural identity is modern. What was new was the idea that this shared collective identity must be linked to political self-government. As Kramer writes, nationalists believe that ``state power should represent the collective will of a particular population or `citizenry' '' (29). This ideal emerged, Kramer argues, in the wake of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Nationalism in Europe & America: Politics, Cultures, and Identities Since 1775 by Lloyd S. Kramer (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 33 (2) – Apr 17, 2013

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

R EVIEWS EDITED BY ANDREW BURSTEIN AND NANCY ISENBERG Nationalism in Europe & America: Politics, Cultures, and Identities Since 1775. By Lloyd S. Kramer. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 2011. Pp. 272. Cloth, $65.00.) Reviewed by Johann Neem In Nationalism in Europe & America, a revised and updated version of a book first published in 1998, Lloyd S. Kramer offers a broad, wellargued introduction to the literature on the history of nationalism. Kramer makes two main arguments. First, nationalism--the idea that states should represent culturally unified peoples--is a modern invention. Second, nationalism is a cultural force that speaks to human beings' deep yearning to be connected to something outside themselves. Both claims are well argued and provocative, and challenge other scholars. The first claim is intended to challenge those who believe that nationalism's roots lie in the mists of time. Kramer is not claiming that shared cultural identity is modern. What was new was the idea that this shared collective identity must be linked to political self-government. As Kramer writes, nationalists believe that ``state power should represent the collective will of a particular population or `citizenry' '' (29). This ideal emerged, Kramer argues, in the wake of

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 17, 2013

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