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Nation Builder: John Quincy Adams and the Grand Strategy of the Republic by Charles N. Edel (review)

Nation Builder: John Quincy Adams and the Grand Strategy of the Republic by Charles N. Edel (review) REVIEWS 1832­1861 (Knoxville, TN, 1997) and From Confederation to Nation: The Early American Republic, 1789­1848 (New York, 2016). Nation Builder: John Quincy Adams and the Grand Strategy of the Republic. By Charles N. Edel. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014. Pp. 392. Cloth, $29.95.) Reviewed by John M. Belohlavek The John Quincy Adams revival is now in full voice. More than a half century ago, Samuel Flagg Bemis crafted his two-volume tribute to the New Englander. Thereafter, Adams's broader legacy has largely been overshadowed by the intense debate over Andrew Jackson, whose polarizing presence divides academics today as it did the public in the antebellum era. While the controversy over ``Old Hickory'' has not abated, many scholars have turned to Adams as the intellectually redemptive alternative in the early republic; the political road not taken by the American voter. Wistfully poring over John Quincy's voluminous diary, letters, writings, and speeches, they see a progressive visionary whose ideas of social justice and republicanism may have played out through the actions of an aggressive federal government. While continuing to credit Adams for the successful exercise of intelligence, timing, and power in the State Department, these scholars lament the failure of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Nation Builder: John Quincy Adams and the Grand Strategy of the Republic by Charles N. Edel (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 35 (3) – Aug 18, 2015

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS 1832­1861 (Knoxville, TN, 1997) and From Confederation to Nation: The Early American Republic, 1789­1848 (New York, 2016). Nation Builder: John Quincy Adams and the Grand Strategy of the Republic. By Charles N. Edel. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014. Pp. 392. Cloth, $29.95.) Reviewed by John M. Belohlavek The John Quincy Adams revival is now in full voice. More than a half century ago, Samuel Flagg Bemis crafted his two-volume tribute to the New Englander. Thereafter, Adams's broader legacy has largely been overshadowed by the intense debate over Andrew Jackson, whose polarizing presence divides academics today as it did the public in the antebellum era. While the controversy over ``Old Hickory'' has not abated, many scholars have turned to Adams as the intellectually redemptive alternative in the early republic; the political road not taken by the American voter. Wistfully poring over John Quincy's voluminous diary, letters, writings, and speeches, they see a progressive visionary whose ideas of social justice and republicanism may have played out through the actions of an aggressive federal government. While continuing to credit Adams for the successful exercise of intelligence, timing, and power in the State Department, these scholars lament the failure of

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 18, 2015

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