Mr. Jefferson’s Hammer: William Henry Harrison and the Origins of American Indian Policy (review)

Mr. Jefferson’s Hammer: William Henry Harrison and the Origins of American Indian Policy (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2012) to argue that in some ways the Constitution was more democratic than the Articles of Confederation, most notably because the former provided for a popularly elected assembly while the latter did not, and the new system was more responsive to the popular will to the extent that it facilitated activism. During the formation and ratification of the Constitution, Federalists certainly implemented their skepticism about people's ability to govern themselves, but the Convention's most reactionary delegates failed to actualize their ideas, and during the ratification debates Federalists by necessity spent most of their time assuring their audience that republican values and the people's will would continue to operate. Their strategy was not to change the revolutionary fiction but to claim that it remained in force. To completely understand the rhetorical landscape Engels and Mercieca describe, students of these eras should more fully consider the evolution of republican ideology, popular understandings of political representation, the roles citizens played in the states, and the efficacy of dissent. But these works raise important issues and therefore merit consideration. Pe ter A . Do rse y is professor and chair of the English Department at Mount http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Mr. Jefferson’s Hammer: William Henry Harrison and the Origins of American Indian Policy (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 32 (1) – Feb 8, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2012) to argue that in some ways the Constitution was more democratic than the Articles of Confederation, most notably because the former provided for a popularly elected assembly while the latter did not, and the new system was more responsive to the popular will to the extent that it facilitated activism. During the formation and ratification of the Constitution, Federalists certainly implemented their skepticism about people's ability to govern themselves, but the Convention's most reactionary delegates failed to actualize their ideas, and during the ratification debates Federalists by necessity spent most of their time assuring their audience that republican values and the people's will would continue to operate. Their strategy was not to change the revolutionary fiction but to claim that it remained in force. To completely understand the rhetorical landscape Engels and Mercieca describe, students of these eras should more fully consider the evolution of republican ideology, popular understandings of political representation, the roles citizens played in the states, and the efficacy of dissent. But these works raise important issues and therefore merit consideration. Pe ter A . Do rse y is professor and chair of the English Department at Mount

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 8, 2012

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