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Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620–1914 (review)

Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620–1914 (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2011) under attack from without, the General Assembly was dealing with western demands for internal improvements, suffrage reform, and especially apportionment in the Assembly. Conservatives in the eastern counties, however, resisted them all. Even so, it was not only an internal state consideration. Conservatives were concerned about how reform of the ``basis'' might compromise the Commonwealth's ability to argue in support of the federal three-fifths formula for Congressional apportionment. By their insistence on maintaining Virginia's prerogatives, the Commonwealth's leaders almost guaranteed the eventual departure of the western counties at the start of the Civil War. Gutzman makes a good case for understanding the early national period in Virginia from the vantage point of the local and particular. But the question is left open as to how many Virginians subscribed to the viewpoints Gutzman articulates here. John Randolph of Roanoke famously declared Virginia to be his country, and Gutzman details several others who shared similar sentiments about their home state, but how far down did such allegiance extend? One might ask the same question of New Englanders who also were notorious for viewing the world through their own particularist lens. But Virginians were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620–1914 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (1) – Feb 11, 2011

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2011) under attack from without, the General Assembly was dealing with western demands for internal improvements, suffrage reform, and especially apportionment in the Assembly. Conservatives in the eastern counties, however, resisted them all. Even so, it was not only an internal state consideration. Conservatives were concerned about how reform of the ``basis'' might compromise the Commonwealth's ability to argue in support of the federal three-fifths formula for Congressional apportionment. By their insistence on maintaining Virginia's prerogatives, the Commonwealth's leaders almost guaranteed the eventual departure of the western counties at the start of the Civil War. Gutzman makes a good case for understanding the early national period in Virginia from the vantage point of the local and particular. But the question is left open as to how many Virginians subscribed to the viewpoints Gutzman articulates here. John Randolph of Roanoke famously declared Virginia to be his country, and Gutzman details several others who shared similar sentiments about their home state, but how far down did such allegiance extend? One might ask the same question of New Englanders who also were notorious for viewing the world through their own particularist lens. But Virginians were

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 11, 2011

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