Military Education and the Emerging Middle Class in the Old South (review)

Military Education and the Emerging Middle Class in the Old South (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2012) teenth century, these elite and interconnected French families formed an influential social, economic, and political minority in many of the major cities of the trans-Mississippian west. They built luxurious urban mansions that broadcasted their tremendous success, even as the population of their Anglo­American neighbors engulfed them. The great achievement of The Bourgeois Frontier is its insistence on exploring the history of the French in the trans-Mississippian west in terms of urban history, where, as Gitlin notes, ``the intersection of place and process resides'' (189). The towns of the French corridor often stood in stark contrast to the Anglo­American settlements of the Ohio Valley, especially in terms of affluence, diversity, and focus. Defined largely by commerce and trade, towns like Detroit and St. Louis were cosmopolitan centers of ``cross-cultural contact and exchange,'' deeply engaged in larger trans-Atlantic and Indian worlds, but also they increasingly served as staging areas of regional transformation and national development in the American Republic (9). Gitlin demonstrates what Francis Parkman and Frederick Jackson Turner failed to acknowledge: The French experience in North America did not end with the loss of Canada in 1763, but continued to play transformative http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Military Education and the Emerging Middle Class in the Old South (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 32 (2) – May 5, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2012) teenth century, these elite and interconnected French families formed an influential social, economic, and political minority in many of the major cities of the trans-Mississippian west. They built luxurious urban mansions that broadcasted their tremendous success, even as the population of their Anglo­American neighbors engulfed them. The great achievement of The Bourgeois Frontier is its insistence on exploring the history of the French in the trans-Mississippian west in terms of urban history, where, as Gitlin notes, ``the intersection of place and process resides'' (189). The towns of the French corridor often stood in stark contrast to the Anglo­American settlements of the Ohio Valley, especially in terms of affluence, diversity, and focus. Defined largely by commerce and trade, towns like Detroit and St. Louis were cosmopolitan centers of ``cross-cultural contact and exchange,'' deeply engaged in larger trans-Atlantic and Indian worlds, but also they increasingly served as staging areas of regional transformation and national development in the American Republic (9). Gitlin demonstrates what Francis Parkman and Frederick Jackson Turner failed to acknowledge: The French experience in North America did not end with the loss of Canada in 1763, but continued to play transformative

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 5, 2012

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