Masterless Mistresses: The New Orleans Ursulines and the Development of a New World Society, 1727–1834 , and: Divided Loyalties in a Doomed Empire: The French in the West from New France to the Lewis and Clark Expedition , and: In this Remote Country: French Colonial Culture in the Anglo–American Imagination, 1780–1860 (review)

Masterless Mistresses: The New Orleans Ursulines and the Development of a New World Society,... Masterless Mistresses: The New Orleans Ursulines and the Development of a New World Society, 1727­1834. By Emily Clark. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007. Pp. 304. Cloth, $59.95.) Divided Loyalties in a Doomed Empire: The French in the West from New France to the Lewis and Clark Expedition. By Daniel Royot. (Newark, DE: University of Delaware Press, 2007. Pp. 282. Cloth, $57.50.) In This Remote Country: French Colonial Culture in the Anglo­ American Imagination, 1780­1860. By Edward Watts. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2006. Pp. 288. Cloth, $59.95.) Reviewed by Darcy R. Fryer When Thomas Jefferson negotiated to purchase Louisiana from Napoleonic France, he had two goals in mind: to sustain an economy grounded in small, owner-operated farms, and to guarantee American access to the Mississippi River and the port of New Orleans in perpetuity. Jefferson knew the land he was purchasing for the United States was not quite empty, and he admonished Lewis and Clark to document the indigenous presence in the regions they visited. But Jefferson had little to say about the enduring presence of Frenchmen and women in the same landscape. Like most Americans who had lived through the Seven Years' http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Masterless Mistresses: The New Orleans Ursulines and the Development of a New World Society, 1727–1834 , and: Divided Loyalties in a Doomed Empire: The French in the West from New France to the Lewis and Clark Expedition , and: In this Remote Country: French Colonial Culture in the Anglo–American Imagination, 1780–1860 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 29 (1) – Feb 27, 2009

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

Masterless Mistresses: The New Orleans Ursulines and the Development of a New World Society, 1727­1834. By Emily Clark. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007. Pp. 304. Cloth, $59.95.) Divided Loyalties in a Doomed Empire: The French in the West from New France to the Lewis and Clark Expedition. By Daniel Royot. (Newark, DE: University of Delaware Press, 2007. Pp. 282. Cloth, $57.50.) In This Remote Country: French Colonial Culture in the Anglo­ American Imagination, 1780­1860. By Edward Watts. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2006. Pp. 288. Cloth, $59.95.) Reviewed by Darcy R. Fryer When Thomas Jefferson negotiated to purchase Louisiana from Napoleonic France, he had two goals in mind: to sustain an economy grounded in small, owner-operated farms, and to guarantee American access to the Mississippi River and the port of New Orleans in perpetuity. Jefferson knew the land he was purchasing for the United States was not quite empty, and he admonished Lewis and Clark to document the indigenous presence in the regions they visited. But Jefferson had little to say about the enduring presence of Frenchmen and women in the same landscape. Like most Americans who had lived through the Seven Years'

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 27, 2009

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