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Magic as Metaphor in Anime: A Critical Study (review)

Magic as Metaphor in Anime: A Critical Study (review) quotes one of the most renowned passages of seventeenth-century antirhetoric rhetoric from Francis Bacon's Advancement of Learning (1605): ``vulgar capacities . . . see learned men's works like the first letter of a patent, or a limned book, which though it hath large flourishes, yet is it but a letter? It seems to me that Pygmalion's frenzy is a good emblem or portraiture of this vanity'' (qtd. 12). In explicating the passage, however, Stark focuses solely upon the allusion to the Pygmalion story of metamorphosis as representative of transformation effected through language, when Bacon writes The Advancement of Learning to petition King James I to ``advance'' experimentalist ``learning'' in place of the studia humanitatis. From this perspective, the surrounding text reflects the antihumanist bent of The Advancement of Learning, as the ``learned men's works'' Bacon refers to represent the writings of those men of ``letter[s]'' presently favored at court, whose rhetorical ``flourishes'' the ``vulgar capacities,'' or illiterate, are compelled to admire like ``portrait[s],'' or images, despite their lack of intellectual substance. Humanists themselves censured the ``vanity'' of the extravagant rhetorical style known as Ciceronianism, and Puritans, too, advocated plain style in the vernacular as part of the Protestant http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft University of Pennsylvania Press

Magic as Metaphor in Anime: A Critical Study (review)

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
The University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1940-5111
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Abstract

quotes one of the most renowned passages of seventeenth-century antirhetoric rhetoric from Francis Bacon's Advancement of Learning (1605): ``vulgar capacities . . . see learned men's works like the first letter of a patent, or a limned book, which though it hath large flourishes, yet is it but a letter? It seems to me that Pygmalion's frenzy is a good emblem or portraiture of this vanity'' (qtd. 12). In explicating the passage, however, Stark focuses solely upon the allusion to the Pygmalion story of metamorphosis as representative of transformation effected through language, when Bacon writes The Advancement of Learning to petition King James I to ``advance'' experimentalist ``learning'' in place of the studia humanitatis. From this perspective, the surrounding text reflects the antihumanist bent of The Advancement of Learning, as the ``learned men's works'' Bacon refers to represent the writings of those men of ``letter[s]'' presently favored at court, whose rhetorical ``flourishes'' the ``vulgar capacities,'' or illiterate, are compelled to admire like ``portrait[s],'' or images, despite their lack of intellectual substance. Humanists themselves censured the ``vanity'' of the extravagant rhetorical style known as Ciceronianism, and Puritans, too, advocated plain style in the vernacular as part of the Protestant

Journal

Magic, Ritual, and WitchcraftUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 10, 2012

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