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Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America (review)

Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America (review) REVIEWS derlands and Atlantic world approaches to capture fully the complexity of identity and loyalty in a dynamic time and place. As a result, the essays give the reader a strong sense of what life was like for both sexes as well as people of various races, classes, and origins in the region during this period as well as demonstrating that historians of colonial and early nineteenth-century America can learn much from the history of the Gulf Coast. The volume's one noticeable drawback is that, because of the biographical nature of the essays, some of the pieces repeat each other, particularly when presenting background information. This is a small criticism and ultimately, the well-organized essays in this volume should be of great interest to scholars of the Gulf Coast, borderlands, Native American history, African American history, and the Atlantic world. Na than iel Mil lett is an assistant professor of history at Saint Louis University MUSE Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in NineteenthCentury America. By Carol Faulkner. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011. Pp. 291. Cloth, $45.00.) Reviewed by Julie Roy Jeffrey Lucretia Mott has presented formidable challenges to historians and biographers, Carol Faulkner suggests. The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (2) – May 5, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
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Abstract

REVIEWS derlands and Atlantic world approaches to capture fully the complexity of identity and loyalty in a dynamic time and place. As a result, the essays give the reader a strong sense of what life was like for both sexes as well as people of various races, classes, and origins in the region during this period as well as demonstrating that historians of colonial and early nineteenth-century America can learn much from the history of the Gulf Coast. The volume's one noticeable drawback is that, because of the biographical nature of the essays, some of the pieces repeat each other, particularly when presenting background information. This is a small criticism and ultimately, the well-organized essays in this volume should be of great interest to scholars of the Gulf Coast, borderlands, Native American history, African American history, and the Atlantic world. Na than iel Mil lett is an assistant professor of history at Saint Louis University MUSE Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in NineteenthCentury America. By Carol Faulkner. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011. Pp. 291. Cloth, $45.00.) Reviewed by Julie Roy Jeffrey Lucretia Mott has presented formidable challenges to historians and biographers, Carol Faulkner suggests. The

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 5, 2012

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