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London and the Making of Provincial Literature: Aesthetics and the Transatlantic Book Trade, 1800–1850 by Joseph Rezek (review)

London and the Making of Provincial Literature: Aesthetics and the Transatlantic Book Trade,... R EVIEWS EDITED BY SEAN P. HARVEY AND LUCIA McMAHON London and the Making of Provincial Literature: Aesthetics and the Transatlantic Book Trade, 1800–1850. By Joseph Rezek. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015. Pp. 286. Cloth, $59.95.) Reviewed by Melissa J. Homestead Like Meredith McGill’s American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting (Philadephia, 2003) and Trish Loughran’s The Republic in Print: Print Culture and U.S. Nation Building, 1770–1870 (New York, 2007), London and the Making of Provincial Literature is ambitious in its scope and argument and fundamentally challenges our understanding of the nation as a category of analysis in American book history of the first half of the nineteenth century. Joseph Rezek offers a bracing reorientation of the literary market in the early nineteenth century, arguing that the United States shared with Scotland and Ireland a provincial orientation toward London as a center of English-language publishing. In The World Republic of Letters (Cambridge, MA, 2004), Pascale Casonova uses Pierre Bourdieu’s literary sociology to argue that Paris’s dominance in the early twentieth century set an aesthetic program for modernism across the globe. Rezek, also relying on Bourdieu, similarly focuses on how an orientation toward London in the “Anglophone Atlantic” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

London and the Making of Provincial Literature: Aesthetics and the Transatlantic Book Trade, 1800–1850 by Joseph Rezek (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 37 (3) – Sep 1, 2017

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

R EVIEWS EDITED BY SEAN P. HARVEY AND LUCIA McMAHON London and the Making of Provincial Literature: Aesthetics and the Transatlantic Book Trade, 1800–1850. By Joseph Rezek. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015. Pp. 286. Cloth, $59.95.) Reviewed by Melissa J. Homestead Like Meredith McGill’s American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting (Philadephia, 2003) and Trish Loughran’s The Republic in Print: Print Culture and U.S. Nation Building, 1770–1870 (New York, 2007), London and the Making of Provincial Literature is ambitious in its scope and argument and fundamentally challenges our understanding of the nation as a category of analysis in American book history of the first half of the nineteenth century. Joseph Rezek offers a bracing reorientation of the literary market in the early nineteenth century, arguing that the United States shared with Scotland and Ireland a provincial orientation toward London as a center of English-language publishing. In The World Republic of Letters (Cambridge, MA, 2004), Pascale Casonova uses Pierre Bourdieu’s literary sociology to argue that Paris’s dominance in the early twentieth century set an aesthetic program for modernism across the globe. Rezek, also relying on Bourdieu, similarly focuses on how an orientation toward London in the “Anglophone Atlantic”

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Sep 1, 2017

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