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Literature Review

Literature Review NATHANIEL Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners LLP Figure 1. Dresden Museum of Military Histor y, Dresden, Germany. Original building completed in 1896, with addition by Studio Daniel Libeskind, completed in 2011. (Bundeswehr/Bienert, 2011) Is there any subject within the field of architectural conservation more fraught than new design in historically sensitive contexts--more specifically, additions to historic buildings or historic districts? Within the vast topic of ``adaptation,'' the addition, as both a primary means of adaptation and its clearest outward form, consistently serves as the focus of heated debate. The addition is also a public concern insofar as it fundamentally impacts the protection of historic building exteriors, which is a consistently legislated and regulated activity (this is far less often the case for interiors).1 Adding to historically significant fabric can therefore be seen as a broad-strokes kind of adaptation in which we, the public, almost always have a confirmed interest. When it comes to additions, there may arguably be a kernel of consensus. We might frame the ideal intervention as a creative response that acknowledges the defining character of heritage while enriching and, in some measure, redefining or re-presenting that same character. But how this intervention is philosophically http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Change Over Time University of Pennsylvania Press

Literature Review

Change Over Time , Volume 2 (2) – Oct 22, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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2153-0548
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Abstract

NATHANIEL Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners LLP Figure 1. Dresden Museum of Military Histor y, Dresden, Germany. Original building completed in 1896, with addition by Studio Daniel Libeskind, completed in 2011. (Bundeswehr/Bienert, 2011) Is there any subject within the field of architectural conservation more fraught than new design in historically sensitive contexts--more specifically, additions to historic buildings or historic districts? Within the vast topic of ``adaptation,'' the addition, as both a primary means of adaptation and its clearest outward form, consistently serves as the focus of heated debate. The addition is also a public concern insofar as it fundamentally impacts the protection of historic building exteriors, which is a consistently legislated and regulated activity (this is far less often the case for interiors).1 Adding to historically significant fabric can therefore be seen as a broad-strokes kind of adaptation in which we, the public, almost always have a confirmed interest. When it comes to additions, there may arguably be a kernel of consensus. We might frame the ideal intervention as a creative response that acknowledges the defining character of heritage while enriching and, in some measure, redefining or re-presenting that same character. But how this intervention is philosophically

Journal

Change Over TimeUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 22, 2012

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