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Licentious Gotham: Erotic Publishing and Its Prosecution in Nineteenth-Century New York (review)

Licentious Gotham: Erotic Publishing and Its Prosecution in Nineteenth-Century New York (review) REVIEWS end. So, in the spirit of Cash's spirited biography, all together now-- Wilkes and Liberty! An drew Sha nkm an is associate professor of history at Rutgers University, Camden. His most recent publication is ``Neither Infinite Wretchedness Nor Positive Good: Mathew Carey and Henry Clay on Slavery and Political Economy During the Long 1820s,'' in Contesting Slavery: The Politics of Bondage and Freedom in the New American Nation, ed. Matthew Mason and John Craig Hammond (Charlottesville, VA, forthcoming). Licentious Gotham: Erotic Publishing and Its Prosecution in Nineteenth-Century New York. By Donna Dennis. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009. Pp. 386. Illustrations, maps. Cloth, $29.95.) Reviewed by Rodney Hessinger Donna Dennis is certainly not the first to consider erotic publications in the nineteenth century. Other books have used the ``flash press'' and the popular pornography of the antebellum era as ways to contextualize explorations of street life in New York. Authors such as Patricia Cline Cohen and Timothy Gilfoyle, for example, have used these texts to better situate their studies of prostitution. Others have looked at these texts as literary products. David S. Reynolds, for example, plumbs this literature to paint a portrait of ``immoral reform,'' showing how http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Licentious Gotham: Erotic Publishing and Its Prosecution in Nineteenth-Century New York (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (3) – Aug 19, 2010

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

REVIEWS end. So, in the spirit of Cash's spirited biography, all together now-- Wilkes and Liberty! An drew Sha nkm an is associate professor of history at Rutgers University, Camden. His most recent publication is ``Neither Infinite Wretchedness Nor Positive Good: Mathew Carey and Henry Clay on Slavery and Political Economy During the Long 1820s,'' in Contesting Slavery: The Politics of Bondage and Freedom in the New American Nation, ed. Matthew Mason and John Craig Hammond (Charlottesville, VA, forthcoming). Licentious Gotham: Erotic Publishing and Its Prosecution in Nineteenth-Century New York. By Donna Dennis. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009. Pp. 386. Illustrations, maps. Cloth, $29.95.) Reviewed by Rodney Hessinger Donna Dennis is certainly not the first to consider erotic publications in the nineteenth century. Other books have used the ``flash press'' and the popular pornography of the antebellum era as ways to contextualize explorations of street life in New York. Authors such as Patricia Cline Cohen and Timothy Gilfoyle, for example, have used these texts to better situate their studies of prostitution. Others have looked at these texts as literary products. David S. Reynolds, for example, plumbs this literature to paint a portrait of ``immoral reform,'' showing how

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 19, 2010

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