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Liberty's Prisoners: Carceral Culture in Early America by Jen Manion (review)

Liberty's Prisoners: Carceral Culture in Early America by Jen Manion (review) REVIEWS Making of an American Maritime Empire (Ithaca, NY, 2014) and currently researching the intersections between nineteenth-century youth culture and settler colonialism. Liberty's Prisoners: Carceral Culture in Early America. By Jen Manion. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015. Pp. 296. Cloth, $45.00.) Reviewed by Ashley Rubin Liberty's Prisoners, by Jen Manion, offers an expansive examination of penal reform in early republican Philadelphia. A firm work of social history, the book explores the lives and experiences of male and (later) female reformers as well as black, immigrant, and poor (native-born) white women and men within and beyond the prison. Manion locates the prison's postRevolution emergence in male social elites' anxiety over rebellious servants, workers, blacks, and women, who demanded the freedom promised to them in the Revolution. Officials forced these groups into labor as public punishment or into the prison, workhouse, or almshouse, which effectively reinforced blacks' and poor whites' past with slavery or enforced servitude and constructed women's role as unskilled domestics. Manion argues that insecure social elites "used the penal system to discipline and punish diverse citizens in ways that advanced social hierarchies rooted in race, gender, class, and sexual differences" (14). Disguised as a humanitarian and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Liberty's Prisoners: Carceral Culture in Early America by Jen Manion (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 37 (2) – May 24, 2017

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS Making of an American Maritime Empire (Ithaca, NY, 2014) and currently researching the intersections between nineteenth-century youth culture and settler colonialism. Liberty's Prisoners: Carceral Culture in Early America. By Jen Manion. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015. Pp. 296. Cloth, $45.00.) Reviewed by Ashley Rubin Liberty's Prisoners, by Jen Manion, offers an expansive examination of penal reform in early republican Philadelphia. A firm work of social history, the book explores the lives and experiences of male and (later) female reformers as well as black, immigrant, and poor (native-born) white women and men within and beyond the prison. Manion locates the prison's postRevolution emergence in male social elites' anxiety over rebellious servants, workers, blacks, and women, who demanded the freedom promised to them in the Revolution. Officials forced these groups into labor as public punishment or into the prison, workhouse, or almshouse, which effectively reinforced blacks' and poor whites' past with slavery or enforced servitude and constructed women's role as unskilled domestics. Manion argues that insecure social elites "used the penal system to discipline and punish diverse citizens in ways that advanced social hierarchies rooted in race, gender, class, and sexual differences" (14). Disguised as a humanitarian and

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 24, 2017

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