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Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World (review)

Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2012) but yet very accessible form. The array of sources consulted is impressive, leaving the reader convinced that this book is bringing to light the most relevant sources bearing the imprimatur of the ``continent'' in word and image. At times, navigating the wealth of sources is made difficult by the book's narrative habit of jumping back and forth between descriptions of intellectual history and historical events. At other times, in the effort of being as inclusive as possible--and this is commensurate with the stated goal of being a ``synthetic'' project--the book overly relies on paraphrase and summaries of current scholarship. But this does not diminish the book's important double message: First, compared with other American colonial societies, Anglo­Americans were the ones most eager to evoke the concept and image of the continent during debates of colonial and national identity; second, continental land claims were fully articulated as both a political and imperial agenda by British Americans and first-generation citizens long before Manifest Destiny became a household phrase. ¨ Ma rtin Bru ckn er is associate professor in English and material culture studies at the University of Delaware. He is the author of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (3) – Aug 13, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2012) but yet very accessible form. The array of sources consulted is impressive, leaving the reader convinced that this book is bringing to light the most relevant sources bearing the imprimatur of the ``continent'' in word and image. At times, navigating the wealth of sources is made difficult by the book's narrative habit of jumping back and forth between descriptions of intellectual history and historical events. At other times, in the effort of being as inclusive as possible--and this is commensurate with the stated goal of being a ``synthetic'' project--the book overly relies on paraphrase and summaries of current scholarship. But this does not diminish the book's important double message: First, compared with other American colonial societies, Anglo­Americans were the ones most eager to evoke the concept and image of the continent during debates of colonial and national identity; second, continental land claims were fully articulated as both a political and imperial agenda by British Americans and first-generation citizens long before Manifest Destiny became a household phrase. ¨ Ma rtin Bru ckn er is associate professor in English and material culture studies at the University of Delaware. He is the author of

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 13, 2012

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