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Lately Sprung up in America: Anne Bradstreet's Untimely Worldmaking

Lately Sprung up in America: Anne Bradstreet's Untimely Worldmaking <p>abstract:</p><p>This essay examines the curious belatedness of Anne Bradstreet&apos;s elegies for Philip Sidney, Guillaume du Bartas, and Elizabeth I in <i>The Tenth Muse</i> (1650). The elegies point toward a broader pattern of "untimeliness" in <i>The Tenth Muse</i>, a result of ongoing tension between two temporal registers: the historical past and the present tense of poetic address. This tension appears as a key theme in "The Four Monarchies," Bradstreet&apos;s long verse history, before emerging as a central conflict in the elegies. The untimeliness of these elegies reflects the contradictions of Bradstreet&apos;s transatlantic worldmaking, a project trailed throughout by a worrying sense of her own lateness. These poems exhibit a temporal distance that forecloses the recovery of a lost English unity. <i>The Tenth Muse</i> thus asks us to see worldmaking as a problem not just of space but also of time. That challenge lies at the heart of the volume&apos;s elegies, which conjure a world of their own through the immediacy of the lyric now—even as they wrestle with the demands of historical occasion.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies University of Pennsylvania Press

Lately Sprung up in America: Anne Bradstreet&apos;s Untimely Worldmaking

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © JEMCS, Inc.
ISSN
1553-3786

Abstract

<p>abstract:</p><p>This essay examines the curious belatedness of Anne Bradstreet&apos;s elegies for Philip Sidney, Guillaume du Bartas, and Elizabeth I in <i>The Tenth Muse</i> (1650). The elegies point toward a broader pattern of "untimeliness" in <i>The Tenth Muse</i>, a result of ongoing tension between two temporal registers: the historical past and the present tense of poetic address. This tension appears as a key theme in "The Four Monarchies," Bradstreet&apos;s long verse history, before emerging as a central conflict in the elegies. The untimeliness of these elegies reflects the contradictions of Bradstreet&apos;s transatlantic worldmaking, a project trailed throughout by a worrying sense of her own lateness. These poems exhibit a temporal distance that forecloses the recovery of a lost English unity. <i>The Tenth Muse</i> thus asks us to see worldmaking as a problem not just of space but also of time. That challenge lies at the heart of the volume&apos;s elegies, which conjure a world of their own through the immediacy of the lyric now—even as they wrestle with the demands of historical occasion.</p>

Journal

Journal for Early Modern Cultural StudiesUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 1, 2019

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