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Landscapes Of Extraction

Landscapes Of Extraction FRANK MATERO Department of Historic Preservation, The University of Pennsylvania Figure 1. Slate quarr y, Slatedale, Penn. (Photo by Joseph E. B. Elliott, 2000) PAGE 2 .................19097$ $CH1 01-22-18 10:48:56 PS Among the oldest of technologies, the extractive industries refer to those processes that involve the removal and processing of raw materials from the earth: mines, quarries, collieries, oil and gas refineries, cement plants, and the heavy clay industries (brick, tile, andterracotta).Theseprocessestransformedentireregionsandmarkets,creatingamuch altered landscape with vast and deep quarries, pits, and mines; enormous furnaces, smelt- ers,andkilns;fabricationshopsandmills;andtransportationnetworkstobringrawmate- rials in and product out. Entire worker communities with houses, schools, churches and synagogues, pool halls, and stores were created to keep local labor close at hand. Many such sites, while rich in historical and architectural value, are also toxic environmental brownfields, thus making them especially problematic for contemporary reuse. The intersection of geology, technology, and culture, these places were an important partofmodernlife,andtheirstoriesareoftenstillaccessiblethroughthevisualtestimony of the land, their structures, and their machinery, as well as in the stories of those who labored there. In recent years this industrial legacy has been proposed as holding the key to regional revitalization by “regeneration through heritage,” not only in the preserva- tion and possible reuse of these http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Change Over Time University of Pennsylvania Press

Landscapes Of Extraction

Change Over Time , Volume 7 (1) – Feb 8, 2018

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
2153-0548

Abstract

FRANK MATERO Department of Historic Preservation, The University of Pennsylvania Figure 1. Slate quarr y, Slatedale, Penn. (Photo by Joseph E. B. Elliott, 2000) PAGE 2 .................19097$ $CH1 01-22-18 10:48:56 PS Among the oldest of technologies, the extractive industries refer to those processes that involve the removal and processing of raw materials from the earth: mines, quarries, collieries, oil and gas refineries, cement plants, and the heavy clay industries (brick, tile, andterracotta).Theseprocessestransformedentireregionsandmarkets,creatingamuch altered landscape with vast and deep quarries, pits, and mines; enormous furnaces, smelt- ers,andkilns;fabricationshopsandmills;andtransportationnetworkstobringrawmate- rials in and product out. Entire worker communities with houses, schools, churches and synagogues, pool halls, and stores were created to keep local labor close at hand. Many such sites, while rich in historical and architectural value, are also toxic environmental brownfields, thus making them especially problematic for contemporary reuse. The intersection of geology, technology, and culture, these places were an important partofmodernlife,andtheirstoriesareoftenstillaccessiblethroughthevisualtestimony of the land, their structures, and their machinery, as well as in the stories of those who labored there. In recent years this industrial legacy has been proposed as holding the key to regional revitalization by “regeneration through heritage,” not only in the preserva- tion and possible reuse of these

Journal

Change Over TimeUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 8, 2018

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