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Kentucky Rising: Democracy, Slavery, and Culture from the Early Republic to the Civil War (review)

Kentucky Rising: Democracy, Slavery, and Culture from the Early Republic to the Civil War (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2012) ``friendly'' Indians at risk.) As Ferguson notes, by this time the majority of enemy Indians were beyond the reach of Illinoisans. Further, some tribes, like the Kaskaskias, had been guaranteed protection under Federal treaty, yet suffered not only from attacks but also from the lack of promised supplies. Word of the final peace from Ghent took months, and many tribes continued to fight, as they had been neither defeated nor consulted. The last real battle took place in Missouri in May of 1815, five months after the treaty was signed. The Menominees did not make peace until 1817, and at least one group of Winnebagos never officially made peace. Edwards and others opted for a relaxed policy toward Indians over the next several years, guessing correctly that Indian removal would be much easier (for the Americans) later on. Illinois in the War of 1812 is a thorough, engaging, and extremely useful narrative analysis. The only substantial criticism would be semantic, perhaps tonal, in nature. Ferguson takes pains to point out that white Illinoisans were often to blame for frontier deaths, and is perfectly correct to note the deliberate brutality of Indian http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Kentucky Rising: Democracy, Slavery, and Culture from the Early Republic to the Civil War (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (4) – Oct 22, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2012) ``friendly'' Indians at risk.) As Ferguson notes, by this time the majority of enemy Indians were beyond the reach of Illinoisans. Further, some tribes, like the Kaskaskias, had been guaranteed protection under Federal treaty, yet suffered not only from attacks but also from the lack of promised supplies. Word of the final peace from Ghent took months, and many tribes continued to fight, as they had been neither defeated nor consulted. The last real battle took place in Missouri in May of 1815, five months after the treaty was signed. The Menominees did not make peace until 1817, and at least one group of Winnebagos never officially made peace. Edwards and others opted for a relaxed policy toward Indians over the next several years, guessing correctly that Indian removal would be much easier (for the Americans) later on. Illinois in the War of 1812 is a thorough, engaging, and extremely useful narrative analysis. The only substantial criticism would be semantic, perhaps tonal, in nature. Ferguson takes pains to point out that white Illinoisans were often to blame for frontier deaths, and is perfectly correct to note the deliberate brutality of Indian

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 22, 2012

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