Keeping the Republic: Ideology and Early American Diplomacy (review)

Keeping the Republic: Ideology and Early American Diplomacy (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2005) the British government, especially Parliament's new taxes. But rather than single out Massachusetts (and by extension himself ) as the primary agent of Patriot resistance, Adams stressed the broad intercolonial nature of the resistance movement and the collaborative agency of merchants, lawyers, mechanics, and artisans in towns and cities throughout the colonies. Adams also sensed the democratizing impact of the Revolution on European society and politics. Commenting on popular stirrings in Switzerland and the Netherlands, Adams affirmed that the American example had touched off a growing popular assertiveness, an ``assuming Pride of the People'' (48), that demanded a greater say in government. Adams understood what modern U.S. historians recognize: the American Revolution was a psychologically empowering movement with democratic results not only for the United States but Europe as well. The twelfth volume of the Papers of John Adams continues the high editorial standards originally set by the founding editors. Selection, transcription, and commentary are done intelligently, accurately, and knowledgeably. Adams's writings during these seven months in the Netherlands are not only a pleasure to read but a reminder once again of the extraordinary capacities of the nation's revolutionary leadership. RO http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Keeping the Republic: Ideology and Early American Diplomacy (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 25 (2) – Jun 13, 2005

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2005) the British government, especially Parliament's new taxes. But rather than single out Massachusetts (and by extension himself ) as the primary agent of Patriot resistance, Adams stressed the broad intercolonial nature of the resistance movement and the collaborative agency of merchants, lawyers, mechanics, and artisans in towns and cities throughout the colonies. Adams also sensed the democratizing impact of the Revolution on European society and politics. Commenting on popular stirrings in Switzerland and the Netherlands, Adams affirmed that the American example had touched off a growing popular assertiveness, an ``assuming Pride of the People'' (48), that demanded a greater say in government. Adams understood what modern U.S. historians recognize: the American Revolution was a psychologically empowering movement with democratic results not only for the United States but Europe as well. The twelfth volume of the Papers of John Adams continues the high editorial standards originally set by the founding editors. Selection, transcription, and commentary are done intelligently, accurately, and knowledgeably. Adams's writings during these seven months in the Netherlands are not only a pleasure to read but a reminder once again of the extraordinary capacities of the nation's revolutionary leadership. RO

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jun 13, 2005

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