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Jazz Age Barcelona (review)

Jazz Age Barcelona (review) r ev ie ws d av id so n, ro be rt a. Jazz Age Barcelona. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2009. viii 248 pp. 44 halftones. The spirit of the moment that Robert Davidson comprehensively and insightfully portrays in his study Jazz Age Barcelona was aptly captured in 1924 by the theatre critic Frank Warschauer when he observed a cabaret revue that brought together performers ``from Russia, Scandinavia, England, France, and America . . . The result is a cozy confusion of languages, which gives the gaping spectator the impression (or the illusion, I don't know for sure) that we are living in a cosmopolis.''1 Although Warschauer was in fact describing a performance in Weimar Berlin, both the cosmopolitanism he celebrates and the cacophony he bemoans illuminate a central characteristic of the Jazz Age internationally, and underscore a surprising affinity between Berlin and Barcelona as contemporaneous cultural centers. Davidson similarly characterizes Barcelona's Fifth District--akin, perhaps, to the French Quarter in New Orleans or the Reeperbahn in Hamburg--by citing the journalist Francesc Madrid: ``Nobody is from that country and yet they all are: the Russians, Montenegrins, Chinese, French, Italians, English populate a poor area and form a republic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hispanic Review University of Pennsylvania Press

Jazz Age Barcelona (review)

Hispanic Review , Volume 78 (4) – Oct 29, 2010

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0639
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Abstract

r ev ie ws d av id so n, ro be rt a. Jazz Age Barcelona. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2009. viii 248 pp. 44 halftones. The spirit of the moment that Robert Davidson comprehensively and insightfully portrays in his study Jazz Age Barcelona was aptly captured in 1924 by the theatre critic Frank Warschauer when he observed a cabaret revue that brought together performers ``from Russia, Scandinavia, England, France, and America . . . The result is a cozy confusion of languages, which gives the gaping spectator the impression (or the illusion, I don't know for sure) that we are living in a cosmopolis.''1 Although Warschauer was in fact describing a performance in Weimar Berlin, both the cosmopolitanism he celebrates and the cacophony he bemoans illuminate a central characteristic of the Jazz Age internationally, and underscore a surprising affinity between Berlin and Barcelona as contemporaneous cultural centers. Davidson similarly characterizes Barcelona's Fifth District--akin, perhaps, to the French Quarter in New Orleans or the Reeperbahn in Hamburg--by citing the journalist Francesc Madrid: ``Nobody is from that country and yet they all are: the Russians, Montenegrins, Chinese, French, Italians, English populate a poor area and form a republic

Journal

Hispanic ReviewUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 29, 2010

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