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Jack Tar's Story: The Autobiographies and Memoirs of Sailors in Antebellum America (review)

Jack Tar's Story: The Autobiographies and Memoirs of Sailors in Antebellum America (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2011) remained focused almost entirely on the United States. There, however, much more that could be said about this fascinating moment in the history of Haiti's own relationship to U.S. abolitionism. Clavin evokes this relationship but does not go into it. That is understandable, of course: No book can do everything, and this book already does so much it seems greedy to ask for more. But it is one way in which the work opens up new questions about how we might think beyond the story of the Haitian Revolution as a symbol, toward the story of how Haitians in the nineteenth century involved themselves in larger Atlantic debates and struggles over slavery and race. This work is methodologically significant for the ways it pushes us to think in interesting ways about how to track and interpret influence and symbol in the political imaginary. It also highlights how much more we still have to learn about how African American communities learned about and thought about the Haitian Revolution. A recent collection edited by Maurice Jackson and Jacqueline Bacon, African Americans and the Haitian Revolution: Selected Essays and Documents (New York, 2009), brings http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Jack Tar's Story: The Autobiographies and Memoirs of Sailors in Antebellum America (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (4) – Nov 5, 2011

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2011) remained focused almost entirely on the United States. There, however, much more that could be said about this fascinating moment in the history of Haiti's own relationship to U.S. abolitionism. Clavin evokes this relationship but does not go into it. That is understandable, of course: No book can do everything, and this book already does so much it seems greedy to ask for more. But it is one way in which the work opens up new questions about how we might think beyond the story of the Haitian Revolution as a symbol, toward the story of how Haitians in the nineteenth century involved themselves in larger Atlantic debates and struggles over slavery and race. This work is methodologically significant for the ways it pushes us to think in interesting ways about how to track and interpret influence and symbol in the political imaginary. It also highlights how much more we still have to learn about how African American communities learned about and thought about the Haitian Revolution. A recent collection edited by Maurice Jackson and Jacqueline Bacon, African Americans and the Haitian Revolution: Selected Essays and Documents (New York, 2009), brings

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 5, 2011

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