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Iran: Downside to the "Twitter Revolution"

Iran: Downside to the "Twitter Revolution" EVGENY MOROZOV blocks, making the country ripe for a technology­driven protest movement." Whether technology was actually driving the protests remains a big unknown. It is certainly a theory that many in the West find endearing: who would have expected that after decades of blasting propaganda from dedicated radio and television channels, Americans would be able to support democracy in Iran via blogs and social networks? Nice theory, but it has very little basis in reality; in fact, it is mostly American-- rather than Iranian--bloggers who are culpable for blowing the role of technology out of any reasonable proportion. Andrew Sullivan, who was tirelessly blogging about the events in Tehran for the Atlantic, emerged as one of the few comprehensive one-stop shops for real-time updates from Iran (or, to be more precise, from the Iranian Internet). Sullivan (and the Huffington Post`s Nico Pitney) made a significant contribution to how the rest of the media--cut off from access to the streets of Tehran and unable to navigate the new media maze as effectively as well-trained bloggers-- portrayed the protests. It was Sullivan who famously proclaimed "The Revolution Will Be Twittered" and called Twitter "the critical tool for organizing the resistance http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dissent University of Pennsylvania Press

Iran: Downside to the "Twitter Revolution"

Dissent , Volume 56 (4) – Sep 24, 2009

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1946-0910
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Abstract

EVGENY MOROZOV blocks, making the country ripe for a technology­driven protest movement." Whether technology was actually driving the protests remains a big unknown. It is certainly a theory that many in the West find endearing: who would have expected that after decades of blasting propaganda from dedicated radio and television channels, Americans would be able to support democracy in Iran via blogs and social networks? Nice theory, but it has very little basis in reality; in fact, it is mostly American-- rather than Iranian--bloggers who are culpable for blowing the role of technology out of any reasonable proportion. Andrew Sullivan, who was tirelessly blogging about the events in Tehran for the Atlantic, emerged as one of the few comprehensive one-stop shops for real-time updates from Iran (or, to be more precise, from the Iranian Internet). Sullivan (and the Huffington Post`s Nico Pitney) made a significant contribution to how the rest of the media--cut off from access to the streets of Tehran and unable to navigate the new media maze as effectively as well-trained bloggers-- portrayed the protests. It was Sullivan who famously proclaimed "The Revolution Will Be Twittered" and called Twitter "the critical tool for organizing the resistance

Journal

DissentUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Sep 24, 2009

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