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Introduction to Special Issue: Political Writing and Literature 1800-1835

Introduction to Special Issue: Political Writing and Literature 1800-1835 Introduction to Special Issue Political Writing and Literature 1800­1835 S A N D R A M . G U S TA F S O N Guest Editor The field of literary history has burgeoned in the last three decades, as historicism has become the predominant methodology in literary studies. In an academic form of sibling rivalry, relations between scholars who take literature as their object of inquiry and scholars who study ``the past'' (that is to say, historians) have grown somewhat strained, even as the two groups arguably share a larger number of assumptions and practices than at any moment in the life of the modern academy. This special issue of the Journal of the Early Republic developed out of an initiative by then-editor Roderick McDonald to bring scholars from the fields of literary studies and history into closer dialogue.1 Politics and literature have provided important points of convergence between the disciplines in the past, notably in the protracted Sandra M. Gustafson is the editor of Early American Literature and associate professor of English at the University of Notre Dame. 1. This issue represents one of several collaborations that I have pursued with other journals to bring early http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Introduction to Special Issue: Political Writing and Literature 1800-1835

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (2) – Apr 28, 2010

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
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Abstract

Introduction to Special Issue Political Writing and Literature 1800­1835 S A N D R A M . G U S TA F S O N Guest Editor The field of literary history has burgeoned in the last three decades, as historicism has become the predominant methodology in literary studies. In an academic form of sibling rivalry, relations between scholars who take literature as their object of inquiry and scholars who study ``the past'' (that is to say, historians) have grown somewhat strained, even as the two groups arguably share a larger number of assumptions and practices than at any moment in the life of the modern academy. This special issue of the Journal of the Early Republic developed out of an initiative by then-editor Roderick McDonald to bring scholars from the fields of literary studies and history into closer dialogue.1 Politics and literature have provided important points of convergence between the disciplines in the past, notably in the protracted Sandra M. Gustafson is the editor of Early American Literature and associate professor of English at the University of Notre Dame. 1. This issue represents one of several collaborations that I have pursued with other journals to bring early

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 28, 2010

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